Digital Content Strategy: Being Agile When Communicating About Health (HLOL #172)

Leigh Curtin-Wilding, MSc is a content author, strategist, storyteller, and marketing communication professional. Her passion is making health information usable and meaningful for today’s consumer. Leigh serves as director of, and teaches at, Boston University’s online graduate program in Health Communication.

In this podcast, Leigh Curtin-Wilding talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Being agile in health communication, prepared to adapt content to changing conditions, policies, and formats.
  • Understanding the user’s journey that includes actions, emotions, and how they access information.
  • Tips for effective communication including understanding the audience, chunking information, having short bursts of information, and using visuals and good design.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 34, 35, 36, 39

Read the transcript of this podcast. 

Writing About Health for the New York Times (HLOL #90)

IMG_0815Theresa Brown, BSN, RN, OCN, is a hospital staff nurse who writes a monthly opinion column for the New York Times called “Bedside.” Her writing focuses on health care policy issues, with particular attention given to the importance of nurses to quality care. Theresa has been a guest on numerous radio shows and on MSNBC’s “Hardball.” She contributes regularly to health care blogs and magazines, and even was invited to the White House. She also is author of the text, Critical Care: A New Nurse Faces Death, Life, and Everything in Between.

In this podcast, Theresa Brown talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How she got started as a nurse. And as a writer.
  • How writing for the public differs from writing for professionals.
  • Issues to consider including: finding topics, protecting patient confidentiality, and receiving reader feedback.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 13, 40, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

A Participatory Approach for Communicating with Diverse Audiences (HLOL #31)

Linda Neuhauser, DrPH, is Clinical Professor of Community Health and Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health. Her work focuses on translating research into improved health interventions and mass communication. Dr. Neuhauser is especially interested in participatory approaches that meet the literacy, linguistic, and cultural needs of diverse audiences. She is Co-Principal Investigator of the UC Berkeley Health Research for Action Center that uses participatory design to create, implement and evaluate communication initiatives that have now reached over 30 million people.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about participatory and user-centered approaches to health communication.

Topics include:

  • Communication challenges for both givers and receivers of information
  • A structured approach to participatory, user-centered design
  • Overcoming objections of limited time, money, or other resources

More Ways to Learn:

  • Neuhauser L, Rothschild R, Graham C, et al. “Participatory Design of Mass Health Communication in Three Languages for Seniors and People With Disabilities on Medicaid,” American Journal of Public Health. 2009;99 (12).
  • Neuhauser L, Constantine WI, Constantine NA, et al. “Promoting Prenatal and Early Childhood Health: Evaluation of a Statewide Materials-based intervention for Parents. American Journal of Public Health. 2007;97(10):1813-1819.
  • Health Literacy Out Loud Podcast #13: Len & Ceci Doak Discuss Health Literacy’s Past, Present, and Future (includes a discussion of the SAM materials assessment tool), Available at http://www.healthliteracyoutloud.com/2009/03/23/hlol-13-len-ceci-doak-discuss-health-literacy’s-past-present-and-future/

Read a transcript of this podcast 

Using Design to Get Readers to Read and Keep Reading (HLOL #29)

Karen Karen SchriverSchriver, PhD is President of KSA Communication Design and Research, a consultancy located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She is former professor of rhetoric and information design at Carnegie Mellon University where she co-directed the graduate programs in professional writing and information design.

Dr. Schriver’s first book, Dynamics in Document Design: Creating Texts for Readers—now in its 9th printing—is regarded as an essential text in its field. Winner of ten national awards for her work, Schriver is writing two new books: the first on developing expertise in information design, and the second on visual and verbal design moves to engage readers online.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about using good information design to get readers to read, and keep reading. Topics include:

  • Using good information design to help readers feel valued and respected
  • Being a visual detective, observing what works and what doesn’t
  • Engaging readers with contrast, consistency, grouping, and other design moves

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast

 

Communicating Clearly on the Web (HLOL #19)

Janice (Ginny) Redish, Ph.D. is president of Redish & Associates, Inc. based in Bethesda, Maryland. In this work, Ginny helps government agencies and private companies create successful web sites through training and consultation on plain language and usability. Among her many accomplishments, Ginny helped develop the federal website www.usability.gov – a guide for developing usable and useful websites.

Ginny has won many awards for her work and is the author of numerous publications on usability, task analysis, accessibility, document design, plain language, and writing for the web. Her latest is the widely-acclaimed book, Letting Go of the Words – Writing Web Content that Works.

In this podcast she talks with Helen Osborne about ways to communicate clearly on the Web. Topics include:

  • Writing for print or the web. What’s the difference? How are they the same?
  • Appreciating that every web use is a conversation started by the site visitor.
  • Understanding your web visitors by thinking of “personas.”
  • Applying principles of plain language to health websites.
  • Using usability testing to measure how well your website works.

More Ways to Learn

About plain language: www.plainlanguage.gov & www.centerforplainlanguage.org

About usability: www.usability.gov & www.usabilityprofessionals.org

Developing Healthcare Materials With and For Village Health Workers (HLOL #18)

Curt Wands-Bourdoiseau is a physician assistant who has worked in free and community clinics across the United States. He has also trained village health workers in rural, isolated and conflict zones in Southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Colombia. Curt now works at the Hesperian Foundation in Berkeley, CA – serving as the project manager for the first major rewrite of the internationally renowned village health worker training book, Where There Is No Doctor.

In this podcast, he talks with Helen Osborne about developing healthcare materials with and for village health workers. Topics include:

  • Overview about the Hesperian Foundation
  • About Hesperian’s books, including Where There Is No Doctor
  • Materials development process using the participatory model
  • Lessons learned and shared with the health literacy community

Ways to Learn More:

Hesperian Foundation (English): http://www.hesperian.org
Hesperian Foundation (Spanish): http://espanol.hesperian.org

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