Health Literacy and Patient Safety (HLOL #88)

Paula Griswold is Executive Director of the Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors, a statewide public-private partnership to improve patient safety and reduce medical errors. Griswold has led many important collaborative projects that include reconciling medications, preventing medication errors, preventing infections, and reducing hospital readmissions—all while improving a patient’s experience of care.

In this podcast, Paula Griswold talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ways that patient safety and health literacy interests intersect
  • Preventing medication errors: strategies and tools to improve understanding
  • Reducing hospital readmissions: advocating for system-wide solutions

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11464

Choosing A Health Plan: Ways to Make This Experience Easier and More Consumer-Friendly (HLOL #87)

Lynn Quincy is a senior health policy analyst for Consumers Union–the policy and advocacy division of Consumer Reports. Quincy works on a wide variety of health policy issues that often focus on consumer protections, consumers’ health insurance literacy, and health insurance reform at the federal and state levels.

In this podcast, Quincy talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing a health plan. Why this task is often so hard for consumers.
  • Ways to make this experience easier and more consumer-friendly.
  • Strategies to help, including: choice architecture, cognitive shortcuts, stories, visuals, and doing the math for consumers.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11463

Making Research Consent Forms Easier for Patients to Understand (HLOL #86)

Kristofer (Kris) Griffith is Manager of Human Research Regulations at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Among his many responsibilities, Griffith manages regulatory aspects of human subjects research as submitted through their Office of Protocol Research, edits the Human Subjects Research Bulletin and, along with an editorial staff, maintains MD Anderson’s Adverse Events Database.

In this podcast, Kris Griffith talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why research consent forms are so very difficult to write. And understand.
  • Strategies to help, including: listing side effects, using consistent and clear wording, formatting pages, and writing short summaries.
  • Useful tools, resources, and ways to learn more.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11407

How to Create and Run Successful Health Literacy Conferences (HLOL #85)

Kari Stanley is Director of Community Benefit at Legacy Health in Portland, Oregon. In this position, Stanley develops and oversees strategies that align Legacy’s mission with its identified community needs. She also leads Legacy’s system-wide health literacy initiative. This includes creating and running a regional health literacy conference.

Stanley talks with Helen Osborne about planning her first, and now, second health literacy conference. This includes recommendations about:

  • Creating a plan with specific goals and metrics.
  • Leading a team that organizes the conference.
  • Choosing topics and vetting speakers so as to meet learning needs.
  • Funding the conference, choosing a venue, and managing other logistics.
  • Assessing success, following-up, and building enthusiasm for next year.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11313

Making a Business Case for Plain Language (HLOL #84)

Joseph Kimble is a long-time champion of plain language. For more than 25 years, he has taught legal writing and drafting at the Thomas Cooley Law School in Michigan. Kimble is a prolific writer, authoring numerous articles and books including Writing for Dollars, Writing to Please: The Case for Plain Language in Business, Government, and Law. He also is editor in chief of The Scribes of Legal Writing and editor of the “Plain Language” column in the Michigan Bar Journal.

Kimble leads, and serves on, many plain language committees, initiatives, and associations. He also helped redraft important legal documents including the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence. No surprise, Joe Kimble has won a lot of awards for his plain language advocacy and accomplishments.

In this podcast, Joe Kimble talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What plain language is and why it matters in law, as well as in health.
  • Ways to answer critics and skeptics with truths about plain language.
  • Examples of how plain language can save time and money.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11285

Clearly Communicating Scientific Information (HLOL #83)

David Nelson MD, MPH is Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the National Cancer Institute. Prior to this position, Dr. Nelson worked as an epidemiologist and health communication scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is the author, co-author, or lead author of numerous books and over 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles.

In this podcast, Dr. Nelson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it can be hard to communicate scientific information to lay audiences.
  • Ways to communicate clearly–beginning with an understanding of your audience, their beliefs, and communication goals.
  • How to tell a scientific story using data, metaphor, visuals, and examples.
  • What to consider when weighing the “ethics of simplicity.”

More ways to learn:

  • Nelson DE, Hesse BW, Croyle RT (2009). Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press. Oxford University Press.
  • National Cancer Institute, US Department of Health and Human Services (2011). Making Data Talk: A Workbook. At http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/cancerlibrary/MDT-Workbook.pdf
  • Parvanta C, Nelson DE, Parvanta SA, Harner RN (2010). Essentials of Public Health Communication. Jones and Bartlett Learning.
  • Remington PL, Nelson DE, Parvanta C (2002). Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners. American Public Health Association.
  • Osborne H (2004). “In Other Words…The Ethics of Simplicity,” On Call magazine. Available at www.healthliteracy.com/ethics-of-simplicity
  • Rosling, Hans (2010). “The Joy of Stats,” Wingspan Productions for BBC. At http://www.gapminder.org/videos/the-joy-of-stats/

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11280

 

Attributes of Health Literate Organizations (HLOL #82)

Cindy Brach is the lead for health literacy and cultural competence at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Brach has overseen the development of several health literacy tools including the Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit. She is also the first author of “Ten Attributes of a Health Literate Health Care Organization,” a discussion paper published in June 2012 by the Institute of Medicine.

In this podcast, Cindy Brach talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What “health literate organizations” are and why they matter.
  • How this paper was inspired by the National Standards on Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) from the HHS Office of Minority Health
  • Ten attributes of health literate health care organizations, along with examples and resources to learn more.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11242

The Future of US Healthcare (HLOL #81)

Dr. G. Timothy Johnson is one of the nation’s leading medical communicators of health care information. As former Chief Medical Editor for ABC News for 25 years, Dr. Johnson provided on-air medical analysis for “Good Morning America,” “World News,” “Nightline” and “20/20.” He is the author of several publications including a new book, The Truth About Getting Sick in America. Deservedly so, Dr. Johnson is the recipient of many prestigious awards.

In this podcast, Dr. Johnson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Three big problems facing US healthcare today. And how these problems compare to those in other developed countries.
  • Ways that patients, family members, health literacy advocates, healthcare providers, librarians, business leaders, the media, and others can help.
  • Outlook for years ahead—with a dose of pessimism and glimmers of hope.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Johnson T, (2010). The Truth About Getting Sick in America: The Real Problems with Health Care and What We Can Do. Hyperion: New York, NY.
  • Groopman J, Hartzband P (2011). Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. Penguin Press HC.
  • “Treating You Better for Less” (June 2, 2012). New York Times editorial.

To read the written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11223

Using Twitter and Other Social Media to Communicate About Health Literacy (HLOL #80)

Jessica N. Rowden, MA, CHES is Manager for Health Communication and eHealth at ODPHP (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion) at the US Department of Health and Human Services. Jessica coordinates and manages health communication activities for a variety of programs including healthfinder.gov, health.gov, and Healthy People 2020. Jessica also oversees ODPHP’s health literacy initiatives, specializing in online health literacy.

In this podcast, Jessica Rowden talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ways that Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media are like conversations with your audience.
  • Strategies and tools to engage the audience, monitor their participation, and organize messages that you send, receive, and follow.
  • Resources, examples, and ways to learn more about social media.

More Ways to Learn:

ODPHD social media links:

Helen Osborne’s social media links:

Online tools, include:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11206

Understanding One Another Even When Language and Accents Differ (HLOL #79)

Barbara Hoekje, Ph.D, is associate professor of communication in the Department of Culture and Communication at Drexel University. She also directs Drexel University’s English Language Center. Hoekje’s focus is about furthering communication and understanding between people of different language and cultural backgrounds. For many years, she has worked with international graduate teaching assistants and international medical graduates in the United States.

In this podcast, Barbara Hoekje talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why the U.S. healthcare workforce is becoming increasingly diverse.
  • How speech patters differ even among those who speak the same language and come from the same country.
  • Strategies that providers and patients can use to improve oral understanding.
  • Ways to set a tone that welcomes everyone into our larger world family.

More ways to learn:

To contact Barbara Hoekje: Hoekje@drexel.edu or 215 895-2067.

For instructors of international doctors/healthcare professionals:

Hoekje B, Tipton S, English Language and the Medical Profession: Instructing and Assessing the Communication Skills of International Physicians (2011, Emerald Press).

For patients and others on the receiving end of health communication: Books, tapes, other resources on nonviolent communication by Marshall Rosenberg.

For foreign born doctors and others health professionals:

  • Resources from the website of the acculturation program of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) (www.ecfmg.org/acculturation/index.html)
  • Chapter on “Language and Communication” by Barbara Hoekje and Marta van Zanten in The International Medical Graduate’s Guide to US Medicine & Residency Training (by P. Alguirre, G. Whelan, and V. Rajput), published by the American College of Physicians, 2008.
  • Practice materials, such as Good practice: Communication skills in English for the medical practitioner (by Marie McCullagh and Roz Wright, published by Cambridge University Press); book and CD

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11178

A Tool That Pictures Pain (HLOL #78)

Kim Kristiansen MD lives and works in Denmark. He not only is practicing physician but also CEO of a company called EvidenceProfile ApS. Dr. Kristiansen’s work often focuses on pain, pain management, and pain research. He, along with two colleagues, invented DoloTest®– a validated, multidimensional pain assessment tool that actively involves the patient.

In this podcast, Dr. Kristiansen talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it is so important, yet difficult, for providers and patients to talk about pain.
  • How chronic (persistent) pain affects many aspects of a person’s life.
  • Ways DoloTest® helps patients and providers reach a shared understanding about pain.

More Ways to Learn:

To read the written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11155

Dr Howard Koh, Assistant Secretary for HHS, Talks About Boosting Health Literacy to Move Beyond the Cycle of Costly Crisis Care (HLOL #77)

Dr. Howard K. Koh serves as the 14th Assistant Secretary for Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Dr. Koh is dedicated to the mission of creating better public health systems for prevention and care so that all people can reach their highest attainable standard of health. Health literacy is key to accomplishing this goal.

In this podcast, Dr. Koh talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How health literacy is a dynamic systems issue and public health challenge.
  • Why health literacy is at a “tipping point,” moving from the margins to mainstream.
  • New Federal policies, initiatives, and tools that boost health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

For a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11149

Ergonomics–Staying Healthy When Using Technology (HLOL #76)

Karen Jacobs Ed.D., OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA is an occupational therapist and a board certified ergonomist. Her extensive list of accomplishments includes being a professor and program director for the post-professional distance education OT programs at Boston University and editing/ authoring numerous books and articles. She is the founding editor of WORK and former president and vice president of the American Occupational Therapy Association.

A primary focus of Dr. Jacobs’ research is about ergonomics. Specifically, how using notebook computers, tablets, backpacks, and other technology affects students of all ages. Ergonomics matters to professionals, too. In this podcast, Karen Jacobs talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ergonomics: How workplace tools, equipment, and the environment affects individuals and populations
  • Why ergonomics matters to health communicators
  • What we can do to stay healthy when using technology

More Ways to Learn:

To read the written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11132

Consumer Reports Health Ratings (HLOL #75)

John Santa MD, MPH is Director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center. For many years, he worked as a primary care physician, healthcare executive, researcher, and policy maker. Now Dr. Santa and others work to evaluate and compare health services, products and practitioners based on current, robust, and independent sources of information.

In this podcast, Dr. Santa and Helen Osborne talk about:

  • Consumer Reports: How it helps consumers make purchasing decisions.
  • Why it is important for individuals to understand health ratings.
  • How Consumer Reports uses symbols, summaries, and narratives.
  • Strategies and resources for listeners to use in day-to-day practice.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11118

Advocacy: From Aha to Action (HLOL #74)

Rich Sagall MD is a retired family physician. About 25 years ago, he left clinical practice to devote all his efforts to running NeedyMeds – offering information about programs to help those who are medically needy. Beyond his work with NeedyMeds, Dr. Sagall also publishes the newsletter, Pediatrics for Parents.

In this podcast, Dr. Sagall talks with Helen Osborne about his journey from being a practicing physician to following his passion and creating a non-profit organization. Topics include:

  • Journey from clinical practice to following your interests and passion
  • Lessons learned about starting and sustaining a non-profit business
  • Finding inspiration in unexpected places

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11110

Plain Writing Act of 2010 (HLOL #73)

Annetta Cheek Ph.D. is an ongoing champion of plain language. With a background in anthropology and many years experience as a federal employee, Cheek helped lead the way to convincing the U.S. Congress to pass the Plain Writing Act of 2010. Now she and others are supporting new legislation to streamline government regulations.

Annetta Cheek’s commitment to plain language is long-standing. Among her many accomplishments, she served as an expert for Vice President Gore’s plain language initiative. More recently, she helped found the non-profit organization, the Center for Plain Language.

In this podcast, Annetta Cheek talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Plain language: What it is and why it is needed for all types of documents.
  • Plain language legislation: How government communications affect everyone.
  • Practical ways to help overcome a “culture of complex communication.”

More Ways to Learn:

For a transcript of this podcast, please visit http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11098

Power of Stories in Patient and Family-Centered Care (HLOL #72)

Marlene Fondrick helps patients share their stories as a way to advance the practice of patient and family-centered care. This work builds on Fondrick’s clinical and administrative experiences as a nurse and hospital vice president. Fondrick adds to this mix her perspective as grandmother of a young child who was diagnosed with cancer.

In this podcast, Marlene Fondrick talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The power of stories in patient- and family-centered care.
  • Examples of real-life stories that have made a difference in patient care.
  • Ways to help patients share their stories, including the most important questions to ask.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care. Available at http://www.ipfcc.org/
  • Crocker L, Johnson B, Privileged Presence: Personal Stories of Connection in Health Care. 2006, Bull Publishing Company.
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words…Tool of Change: Telling and Listening to Stories,” On Call, October 16, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/telling-stories

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Talking About Medical Debt (HLOL #71)

Erin Moaratty is Chief of External Communications for the Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF). For many years, Erin was PAF’s senior case manager – helping people who have catastrophic illnesses deal with issues about access to care, health insurance, employment retention, and medical debt.

In this podcast, Erin Moaratty talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Medical debt: What this term means, who it affects, why it matters so much.
  • Patient Advocacy Foundation (PAF): Services, resources, and examples of how PAF helps patients with catastrophic illnesses.
  • Ways you can help: Strategies for professionals, friends, family members, and organizations.

More ways to learn:

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Animal-Human Bond in Healthcare (HLOL #70)

Alice Villalobos, DVM, DPNAP is Director of Pawspice in Hermosa Beach and Animal Oncology Consultation Service in Woodland Hills, CA. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Villalobos is a founding member of the Veterinary Cancer Society and president of the Society for Veterinary Medical Ethics. She writes and lectures worldwide on veterinary oncology, quality of life, bioethics, palliative/hospice care for animals, and the human-animal bond.

In this podcast, Dr. Villalobos talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How the animal-human bond enriches people, pets, and the environment.
  • Ways that animals help humans during sickness as well as health.
  • Strategies practitioners can use when talking with patients who have pets.

More Ways to Learn:

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Problematic Words in Health Research (HLOL #69)

Jessica Ridpath founded a research-centric plain language initiative called Program for Readability In Science & Medicine (PRISM) at Group Health Research Institute in Seattle, WA. In this initiative, Ridpath provides plain language editing, training, and consultation for health researchers, health education writers, hospital staff, and public health employees. Her focus is often on writing clear and understandable informed consent forms for research.

In this podcast, Ridpath talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Informed consent forms for research. Why these forms can be difficult to read and ways to make them easier for the lay public to understand.
  • Problematic words. Examples of words and terms that may cause confusion even though these words are short and familiar.
  • Strategies and tools to improve understanding of health research concepts.

More Ways to Learn:

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Health Literacy Journey (HLOL #68)

Maureen Johnson is Manager of Women’s Consumer Health Information at the Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. She is committed to a patient-centered approach to health literacy and believes that large hospitals and health services need high-level support and robust systems to ensure that these efforts are sustained over time.

Johnson received a Victorian Travelling Fellowship from the Victorian Quality Council. This fellowship allows emerging leaders to conduct international investigations into innovative responses to health care quality and safety. As part of this program, Johnson recently visited the USA, Canada, England, the Netherlands and Finland.

In this podcast, Maureen Johnson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Johnson’s health literacy journey. Why she traveled, who she met, what she learned along the way.
  • The value of health literacy networking. How it extends beyond hospitals and healthcare settings.
  • Salutogenesis. A way of looking at individual health factors, not just causes of disease.

More Ways to Learn:

Leading a Health Literacy Task Force (HLOL #67)

Susan Pisano is the Vice President of Communications for America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) — a national association whose member companies provide health insurance coverage to more than 200 million Americans. As Vice President for Communications, Pisano acts as a spokesperson for AHIP and is responsible for outreach to member companies, the news media, and other major audiences. Pisano also serves as the primary staffer for AHIP’s Health Literacy Task Force.

In this podcast, Susan Pisano talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Organizing a health literacy task force. How, who, what, why, and when of leading a large and diverse committee.
  • Making a strategic plan and being clear about goals.
  • Creating tools, tookits, and policies to help task force members.
  • Measuring success as a way move projects and ideas forward.

More Ways to Learn:

  • America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), http://www.ahip.org/
  • AHIP’s health literacy resources. Includes “Health Plan Organizational Assessment of Health Literacy Activities.” Learn more and access health literacy tools at http://www.ahip.org/content/default.aspx?bc=39|341|22050
  • Peterson PN, Shetterly SM, Clarke CL et al. “Health Literacy and Outcomes Among Patients with Heart Failure, JAMA 2011:305(16):1695-1701.
  • Osborne H (podcast), April 26, 2011. Health Literacy Out Loud #57: Texting Important Health Messages. An audio interview with Julie Gazmararian. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-texting

Health Literacy from A to Z (HLOL #66)

Helen Osborne M.Ed., OTR/L helps others communicate health information in ways that patients, families, and caregivers can understand. Helen is president of Health Literacy Consulting, founder of Health Literacy Month, and host of the podcast series, “Health Literacy Out Loud.” She is also the author of “Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message.”

In this podcast, Helen talks with Adam Weiss about the second edition of her book, “Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message.”

Together, Helen and Adam discuss:

  • Who this book is for. What is new and different in the second edition.
  • Why health literacy matters to everyone communicating health information.
  • How health literacy is about mutual understanding between providers (anyone on the giving end of health communication) and patients (everyone on the receiving end of such communication).

More Ways to Learn:

Helping Patients Take Medication Safely and Effectively (HLOL #65)

Rebecca Burkholder JD is a healthcare attorney and Vice President of Health Policy at the National Consumers League–a national, nonprofit membership organization that has been representing consumers and workers since1899. Burkholder coordinates the League’s work on various health care issues including safe use of medication, patient safety, doctor-patient communication, and direct-to-consumer advertising. She also coordinates the League’s new national medication adherence campaign, “Script Your Future.”

In this Health Literacy Out Loud podcast, Burkholder talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Medication adherence. What it is and why it is so important today.
  • Research about why patients do not take medication as directed.
  • Script Your Future, a broad-based educational campaign with tools, resources, and links to help improve medication adherence.

More Ways to Learn:

 

Chronic Engagement: Habits That Support Good Health (HLOL #64)

Jan Berger, MD, MJ, is the Chief Medical Officer at Silverlink Communications. She leads Silverlink’s population health initiatives in areas such as adherence, clinical messaging, engagement and health behavior change. Dr. Berger also is active on numerous national committees on quality and is the Editor in Chief of the American Journal of Pharmacy Benefit.  In all these roles, Dr. Berger is passionate that communications can significantly improve health outcomes.

In this podcast, Dr. Berger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “Chronic engagement,” a positive term referring to lifelong habits that support good health.
  • Using technology to communicate health information in scalable, personalized, cost-effective ways.
  • Measuring the effectiveness of health communication and chronic engagement.

More Ways to Learn: