Public health communication

Ways that public health specialists, community organizations, journalists, librarians, educators, and others can communicate with the general public.

Ethnodrama: Conveying Health Concepts in Culturally Relevant Ways (HLOL #140)

Anita Woodley - Headshot Black & WhiteAnita Woodley is an award-winning actress, playwright, producer, musician, poet, and journalist. She also is a certified HIV counselor and advocate for many healthcare initiatives. One powerful way that Anita communicates is with ethnodramas—non-traditional theatrical performances based on ethnographic research data used to educate, promote, and prevent harmful practices to overall health.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Anita Woodley about:

  • How theatric performances can communicate health messages in meaningful, memorable, and culturally relevant ways.
  • Examples of using characters, language, and laughter to teach about health.
  • Woodley’s suggestions about ways everyone (not just actors) can be authentic and inform those we care about, and care for.

More Ways to Learn

  • Anita Woodley: Award-winning Entertainer, Journalist, and Visual Artist. Read about, watch, and learn much more at Anitawoodley.com
  • Strang F, Gonzalez S, 100 Perks of Having Cancer plus 100 Health Tips For Surviving It. At http://100perksofhavingcancer.com

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 13, 14, 18, 31, 40, 42.

Read the written podcast transcript.

Reviewing Health News (HLOL #135)

HiRes - STE_7127 2Gary Schwitzer has published HealthNewsReview.org since 2006. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and director of the Center for Media Communication & Health. Previously, he directed a health journalism graduate program. Schwitzer has been working in, and with, the media for many years. No surprise, he has received numerous awards for his many contributions to medical communication.

In this podcast, Gary Schwitzer talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How HealthNewsReview analyzes, grades, and works to improve journalism and public dialogue about health news.
  • Ways health communicators can help increase the public’s understanding about health issues, information, and implication of their choices. An example is making sense about screening, versus diagnostic, tests.
  • Resources and models of clearly communicating nuanced health information.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 13.

Read the written transcript.

Health Literacy & the Newly Insured (HLOL #123)

DrDonRubin headshot 2010 compressed documents 269kbDr. Don Rubin is Emeritus Professor of Speech Communication, of Language & Literacy Education, and of Linguistics, at the University of Georgia. Among his many projects and responsibilities, Don chairs the Georgia Alliance for Health Literacy. He also works closely with community-based organizations that offer Navigator services—designed to assist consumers seeking health insurance through Affordable Care Act insurance exchanges.

In this podcast, Dr. Don Rubin talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why health insurance is difficult for many Americans to understand.
  • How health insurance Navigators are helping. And why Dr. Rubin considers them to be Health Literacy Heroes.
  • Examples of strategies that Navigators are using to clearly explain complex health insurance concepts.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 13, 24, 27, 30.

Read this podcast’s written transcript.

Disruptive Innovation: The Next Generation of Health Literacy Products and Services (HLOL #122)

Bio PicPamela Kelly, MBA, MJ is Director of Partnerships & Initiatives at Health Literacy Missouri (HLM). Since joining HLM in 2012, she has been reinventing what it means to be a health communications leader in the 21st century marketplace. Pam leads HLM’s statewide business development efforts and has succeeded in strengthening strategic partnerships with clients across the public and private sectors. She indeed has had a significant, measurable impact on health in Missouri.

In this podcast, Pamela Kelly talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it’s time for health literacy to move from an educational to a business model.
  • Disruptive innovation. Reaching audiences in new and different ways.
  • Tips and lessons learned for health literacy advocates at all levels of experience, savvy, and spheres of influence.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 27, 40, 42.

Read this podcast’s written transcript.

Creating A Health Awareness Campaign (HLOL #116)

NeyalHeadshot-SmallerNeyal Ammary-Risch MPH, MCHES, is the Director of the National Eye Health Education Program and Health Literacy Coordinator at the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Her work includes overseeing programs that raise awareness about early detection and treatment of eye disease and the promotion of vision rehabilitation.

In this podcast Neyal Ammary-Risch talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How campaigns can help raise awareness about big health topics.
  • Examples of helpful awareness-raising strategies. These include using multiple communication formats, training trusted sources (such as lay health educators), and creating community partnerships.
  • Ideas about ways to raise awareness about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

  • National Eye Institute, National Eye Health Education Program. With links to many useful resources including the Healthy Eyes Toolkit. At www.nei.nih.gov/NEHEP
  • Fertman CI, Allensworth DD, Health Promotion Programs: From Theory to Practice.Jossey-Bass (2010). Ammary-Risch wrote the chapter, “Communicating Health Information Effectively.”
  • Ammary-Risch N, In Mommy’s Garden: A Book to Help Explain Cancer to Young Children. Learn more and order online at http://books.canyonbeach.com/inmommysgarden

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 13, 27.

Read the podcast transcript

Health Literacy & New Technology: An App Challenge (HLOL #115)

LierLanghansODPHPTo reach and teach people “where they are,” the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services challenged designers to create a “health literate app” for use on mobile devices (cell phones and tablets). This builds on health content from ODPHP’s consumer-oriented website about prevention, www.healthfinder.gov

This podcast is with the co-leader’s of ODPHP’s Mobile App Challenge:

  • Ellen Langhans (right, in the photo) is the healthfinder.gov Program Manager at ODPHP. Her role is to ensure the use of plain language and health literacy principles in healthfinder.gov along with its outreach and marketing materials.
  • Silje Lier is a Communication Advisor at ODPHP. She manages the outreach community for healthfinder.gov. She also supports outreach for many ODPHP initiatives including Healthy People 2020, Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy.

In this podcast, Ellen Langhans and Silje Lier talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • How people use mobile devices to access health information.
  • What ODPHP’s Mobile App Challenge was and how it led to the development of an app that is creative, functional, and consistent with health literacy principles.
  • Good app features to include action-oriented content, longevity (capacity for the app to grow and change), and functions that keep users engaged.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 27, 34, 36.

Read the podcast transcript

IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable (HLOL #114)

lhernandez150pctscaleLyla Hernandez has been a Senior Program Officer at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for many years. She served as the study director for projects that include public health, health indicators, genomics, complementary and alternative medicine, and Gulf War veterans’ health. Now, Hernandez is the Staff Director of IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable.

In this podcast, Lyla Hernandez talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable: What it is, who’s involved, and how it works.
  • Examples of how IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable is helping to create a more health literate environment for individuals and organizations.
  • Free learning tools and resources from IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable. These include workshops, discussion papers, and webcasts.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Comics and Medicine: That’s Health Literacy, Too. (HLOL #110)

MKMK Czerwiec is a nurse who makes comics. MK has a Masters degree in medical humanities from Northwestern University, where she developed and teaches a seminar to medical students called “Drawing Medicine.” With Ian Williams, a doctor in the UK who also makes comics, MK co-runs GraphicMedicine.org, a website that looks at the intersection between comics and the discourse of medicine.

In this podcast, MK Czerwiec talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How comics use sequential art to tell about health, illness, and medicine.
  • Why comics are effective and how they transcend differences in culture, language, and educational level.
  • What listeners can do to find, create, use, and learn more about comics in medicine.

Ways to Learn More:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 14, 17, 31, 32, 38, 40.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

CDC’s “Clear Communication Index” (HLOL #108)

Baur photo April 2013Cynthia Baur, PhD, works at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and leads CDC’s health literacy and plain language initiatives. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Baur is lead editor of the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy and with Dr. Christine Prue, also of the CDC, co-developed CDC’s Clear Communication Index.

In this podcast, Cynthia Baur talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What CDC’s Clear Communication Index is, why it’s needed, and how it compares to other communication assessment tools.
  • How to use the Index when revisiting, revising, or creating a wide range of public communication products. These include print materials, web postings, audio scripts, and social media messages.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 3, 6, 16, 26, 30.

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11786

 

 

 

Creating a Sustainable Health Literacy Business Model (HLOL #105)

MegMeg Poag is the Executive Director of the Literacy Coalition of Central Texas. With training as a social worker and experience in health and human services, Meg has worked in the areas of housing, substance abuse, mental health, and literacy. Now Meg focuses on the design and delivery of specialized health literacy interventions.

In this podcast, Meg Poag talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Challenges in getting adequate funding for adult literacy programs, and health literacy programs.
  • The importance of creating a business plan. Why it’s needed, what’s included, and an example of how a business plan can help.
  • Creating a package of health literacy assessments, interventions, and services that hospitals actually will pay for.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 21, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Choosing Wisely: A Campaign Helping Patients Be Engaged Consumers (HLOL #104)

Rothschild HeadshotBeccah Rothschild, MPA, is the Senior Outreach Leader for the Choosing Wisely campaign at Consumer Reports. Beccah has over 15 years experience in the fields of adult literacy, health literacy, health communication, and outreach including direct service interventions, research, and policy. Her role at Consumer Reports focuses on patient engagement around the issues of overuse and misuse of medical tests, treatments, and procedures that provide little benefit and in some cases cause harm.

In this podcast, Beccah Rothschild talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing Wisely. How this campaign helps patients, consumers, and providers engage in important conversations about medical tests, treatments, and procedures.
  • Consumer-friendly teaching materials from Choosing Wisely. These materials not only are free and easy-to-read but also approved by national medical societies and organizations.
  • Health literacy, and its important role in the Choosing Wisely campaign.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 8, 13, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

When Communicating Risk, Consider What Patients Need and Want to Know (HLOL #102)

BZF Donaghue headshotBrian J. Zikmund-Fisher, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at University of Michigan’s School of Public Health. He also is a Research Assistant Professor in their Internal Medicine Department and affiliated with several other University of Michigan’s programs. With a background in decision psychology and behavioral economics, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher teaches, researches, and writes about meaningful ways to communicate risk and other number-based health messages.

In this podcast, Dr. Zikmund-Fisher talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How all risk communications are not the same.
  • The responsibility of the communicator to consider the spectrum of patient’s needs before deciding what to provide.
  • How to align the format of risk information to its purpose. In other words, how to know when we want numbers and when we might not.
  • The pros and cons of different formats for discussing risk including icon arrays and other visual ways of showing probabilities, labels that group numbers into categories, and narratives that recount lived experience but ignore probability.
  • Thoughts about the history and future of risk communication.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Zikmund-Fisher BJ, “The Right Tool is What They Need, Not What We Have: A Taxonomy of Appropriate Levels of Precision in Patient Risk Communication,” Medical Care Research and Review. Published online September 6, 2012. Full text available at http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/98434
  • Icon Array, a free online tool to communicate your risk information in a matrix, http://www.iconarray.com

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 8, 9, 11, 13, 26, 38.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Communicating Clearly In a Crisis (HLOL #98)

suzanne 4Suzanne O’Connor, MSN, has worked as an advanced practice nurse for many years in hospital emergency departments, intensive care units, and outpatient practices. She now educates and consults with clinicians of all disciplines about crisis communication, conflict resolution, patient satisfaction, and working with difficult people.

In this podcast, Suzanne O’Connor talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Crisis communication. And why people have trouble listening and absorbing information when fear and anxiety is high.
  • Ways to build rapport, establish trust, and communicate in clear, yet caring, ways.
  • Strategies to customize information, reduce resistance, and confirm understanding throughout difficult conversations.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 13, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Diagnosing Your Practice with Low Health Literacy (HLOL #96)

D in officeDarren DeWalt, MD, is practicing physician and associate professor in the division of general internal medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He researches ways that patients with low-literacy can self-manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart failure, COPD, and asthma. He also looks at how practices can achieve better outcomes through patient-physician communication and health system design. Dr. DeWalt is the lead author of AHRQ’s Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit.

In this podcast, Dr. DeWalt talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Universal precautions and health literacy. How combining these concepts can help patients better understand health information.
  • A tool to “diagnose” if your practice has low health literacy.
  • Ways to prioritize health literacy problems and implement effective solutions.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 4, 27.

Read a written transcript of this podcast.

Numeracy, Chronic Disease, and Repeat Emergency Room Visits or Hospitalizations (HLOL #92)

PastedGraphic-1Candace McNaugton MD, MPH, is an emergency medicine physician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a fellow in the Vanderbilt Emergency Medicine Research Training Program. Dr. McNaughton also completed a VA Quality Scholar Fellowship, focusing on issues of quality and patient safety. Her research looks at patients with heart failure, hypertension and other chronic diseases who seek care in the emergency department.

In this podcast, Dr. McNaughton talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Numeracy and chronic disease. Number-based tasks that patients must do to care for themselves at home.
  • Return ER visits and hospitalizations. Patients with low numeracy skills appear to be at more risk for acute exacerbation of heart failure symptoms.
  • What can all of us do to help? Recommendations for clinicians, patients, and healthcare systems.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 5, 7, 26.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Helping People Learn About Health in India (HLOL #91)

Aniruddha Malpani MD is a long-time health literacy advocate. He not only is an IVF (fertility) specialist in Mumbai, India but also runs the world’s largest free patient education library, HELP: Health Education Library for People. Dr. Malpani believes that empowered patients can help heal “sick” healthcare systems. In this video, Dr. Malpani talks with Helen Osborne about how this vision is happening in India.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 13, 27, 32, 40.

Read a transcript of this video interview.

Writing About Health for the New York Times (HLOL #90)

IMG_0815Theresa Brown, BSN, RN, OCN, is a hospital staff nurse who writes a monthly opinion column for the New York Times called “Bedside.” Her writing focuses on health care policy issues, with particular attention given to the importance of nurses to quality care. Theresa has been a guest on numerous radio shows and on MSNBC’s “Hardball.” She contributes regularly to health care blogs and magazines, and even was invited to the White House. She also is author of the text, Critical Care: A New Nurse Faces Death, Life, and Everything in Between.

In this podcast, Theresa Brown talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How she got started as a nurse. And as a writer.
  • How writing for the public differs from writing for professionals.
  • Issues to consider including: finding topics, protecting patient confidentiality, and receiving reader feedback.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 13, 40, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Choosing A Health Plan: Ways to Make This Experience Easier and More Consumer-Friendly (HLOL #87)

Lynn Quincy is a senior health policy analyst for Consumers Union–the policy and advocacy division of Consumer Reports. Quincy works on a wide variety of health policy issues that often focus on consumer protections, consumers’ health insurance literacy, and health insurance reform at the federal and state levels.

In this podcast, Quincy talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing a health plan. Why this task is often so hard for consumers.
  • Ways to make this experience easier and more consumer-friendly.
  • Strategies to help, including: choice architecture, cognitive shortcuts, stories, visuals, and doing the math for consumers.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 11, 13, 30, 36, 39.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Clearly Communicating Scientific Information (HLOL #83)

David Nelson MD, MPH is Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the National Cancer Institute. Prior to this position, Dr. Nelson worked as an epidemiologist and health communication scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is the author, co-author, or lead author of numerous books and over 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles.

In this podcast, Dr. Nelson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it can be hard to communicate scientific information to lay audiences.
  • Ways to communicate clearly–beginning with an understanding of your audience, their beliefs, and communication goals.
  • How to tell a scientific story using data, metaphor, visuals, and examples.
  • What to consider when weighing the “ethics of simplicity.”

More ways to learn:

  • Nelson DE, Hesse BW, Croyle RT (2009). Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press. Oxford University Press.
  • National Cancer Institute, US Department of Health and Human Services (2011). Making Data Talk: A Workbook. At http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/cancerlibrary/MDT-Workbook.pdf
  • Parvanta C, Nelson DE, Parvanta SA, Harner RN (2010). Essentials of Public Health Communication. Jones and Bartlett Learning.
  • Remington PL, Nelson DE, Parvanta C (2002). Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners. American Public Health Association.
  • Osborne H (2004). “In Other Words…The Ethics of Simplicity,” On Call magazine. Available at www.healthliteracy.com/ethics-of-simplicity
  • Rosling, Hans (2010). “The Joy of Stats,” Wingspan Productions for BBC. At http://www.gapminder.org/videos/the-joy-of-stats/

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 9, 11, 26, 28, 30.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

 

Dr Howard Koh, Assistant Secretary for HHS, Talks About Boosting Health Literacy to Move Beyond the Cycle of Costly Crisis Care (HLOL #77)

Dr. Howard K. Koh serves as the 14th Assistant Secretary for Health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Dr. Koh is dedicated to the mission of creating better public health systems for prevention and care so that all people can reach their highest attainable standard of health. Health literacy is key to accomplishing this goal.

In this podcast, Dr. Koh talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How health literacy is a dynamic systems issue and public health challenge.
  • Why health literacy is at a “tipping point,” moving from the margins to mainstream.
  • New Federal policies, initiatives, and tools that boost health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Ergonomics–Staying Healthy When Using Technology (HLOL #76)

Karen Jacobs Ed.D., OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA is an occupational therapist and a board certified ergonomist. Her extensive list of accomplishments includes being a professor and program director for the post-professional distance education OT programs at Boston University and editing/ authoring numerous books and articles. She is the founding editor of WORK and former president and vice president of the American Occupational Therapy Association.

A primary focus of Dr. Jacobs’ research is about ergonomics. Specifically, how using notebook computers, tablets, backpacks, and other technology affects students of all ages. Ergonomics matters to professionals, too. In this podcast, Karen Jacobs talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ergonomics: How workplace tools, equipment, and the environment affects individuals and populations
  • Why ergonomics matters to health communicators
  • What we can do to stay healthy when using technology

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 40.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Consumer Reports Health Ratings (HLOL #75)

John Santa MD, MPH is Director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center. For many years, he worked as a primary care physician, healthcare executive, researcher, and policy maker. Now Dr. Santa and others work to evaluate and compare health services, products and practitioners based on current, robust, and independent sources of information.

In this podcast, Dr. Santa and Helen Osborne talk about:

  • Consumer Reports: How it helps consumers make purchasing decisions.
  • Why it is important for individuals to understand health ratings.
  • How Consumer Reports uses symbols, summaries, and narratives.
  • Strategies and resources for listeners to use in day-to-day practice.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 9, 11, 13, 38.

Read a written transcript of this podcast.

Health Literacy Journey (HLOL #68)

Maureen Johnson is Manager of Women’s Consumer Health Information at the Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. She is committed to a patient-centered approach to health literacy and believes that large hospitals and health services need high-level support and robust systems to ensure that these efforts are sustained over time.

Johnson received a Victorian Travelling Fellowship from the Victorian Quality Council. This fellowship allows emerging leaders to conduct international investigations into innovative responses to health care quality and safety. As part of this program, Johnson recently visited the USA, Canada, England, the Netherlands and Finland.

In this podcast, Maureen Johnson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Johnson’s health literacy journey. Why she traveled, who she met, what she learned along the way.
  • The value of health literacy networking. How it extends beyond hospitals and healthcare settings.
  • Salutogenesis. A way of looking at individual health factors, not just causes of disease.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 27, 40, 41, 42.

Leading a Health Literacy Task Force (HLOL #67)

Susan Pisano is the Vice President of Communications for America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) — a national association whose member companies provide health insurance coverage to more than 200 million Americans. As Vice President for Communications, Pisano acts as a spokesperson for AHIP and is responsible for outreach to member companies, the news media, and other major audiences. Pisano also serves as the primary staffer for AHIP’s Health Literacy Task Force.

In this podcast, Susan Pisano talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Organizing a health literacy task force. How, who, what, why, and when of leading a large and diverse committee.
  • Making a strategic plan and being clear about goals.
  • Creating tools, tookits, and policies to help task force members.
  • Measuring success as a way move projects and ideas forward.

More Ways to Learn:

  • America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), http://www.ahip.org/
  • AHIP’s health literacy resources. Includes “Health Plan Organizational Assessment of Health Literacy Activities.” Learn more and access health literacy tools at http://www.ahip.org/content/default.aspx?bc=39|341|22050
  • Peterson PN, Shetterly SM, Clarke CL et al. “Health Literacy and Outcomes Among Patients with Heart Failure, JAMA 2011:305(16):1695-1701.
  • Osborne H (podcast), April 26, 2011. Health Literacy Out Loud #57: Texting Important Health Messages. An audio interview with Julie Gazmararian. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-texting

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 13, 30.

Mammograms: Clearly Communicating New Guidelines (HLOL #63)

Diana Zuckerman, Ph.D. is the President of the National Research Center for Women & Families–a nonpartisan, nonprofit research and education organization that works to evaluate and improve policies and programs that affect the health and safety of adults and children.

Dr. Zuckerman is a nationally respected expert on health and health policy, including the safety and effectiveness of medical treatments and the impact of violence on women and families. She has testified dozens of times before U.S. Congressional hearings and other federal and state agencies. Dr. Zuckerman is often interviewed or quoted on television, radio, and the national press.

In this podcast, Dr. Zuckerman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why and how national guidelines, policies, and recommendations change.
  • How to clearly communicate ever-changing, nuanced health messages.
  • Communication challenges ahead as science continues to evolve.

More Ways to Learn:

  • National Research Center for Women & Families, http://www.center4research.org/
  • Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund, a new program of the National Research Center for Women & Families. Available at http://www.stopcancerfund.org
  • Osborne H (host). 2011, April 5. Health Literacy Out Loud #56: Helping Others Understand Health Messages. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-helping-others-understand
  • Schousboe JT, Kerlikowske K, Loh A, Cummings SR, “Personalizing Mammography by Breast Density and Other Risk Factors for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness,” Annals of Internal Medicine. July 5, 2011, 155:10-20.
  • Welch HG, Schwartz LM, Woloshin, Overdiagnosed. Beacon Press, 2011.
  • Woloshin S, Schwartz LM, Welch HG, Know Your Chances: Understanding Health Statistics. University of California Press, 2008. (The book can be downloaded for free from http://www.jameslindlibrary.org/testing-treatments.html

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 13, 27, 30.

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