Health Literacy and Hearing Loss (HLOL #103)

Bonnie, Ranger, and Mickey at a conferenceBonnie Bartos PA-C, MHP, CDE is a Physician Assistant and Certified Diabetes Educator in the Mayo Clinic Health System. Her clinical focus is primary care, diabetes, and anticoagulation care. Bartos is a long-time health literacy advocate who uses pictograms as well as many other formats to teach patients who are visual learners, those who have poor literacy skills, use English as a second language, or have disabilities. Bartos knows the challenges of health education as she herself has a severe-to-profound hearing loss.

In this podcast, Bonnie Bartos talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The spectrum of hearing loss, including how hearing loss can affect speech.
  • Strategies to communicate clearly with people who have hearing loss.
  • Types of technology designed to help people with hearing loss.
  • Bartos’s story about how she lost hearing. And ways her service dogs help.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Osborne H (host), Cushman C (guest). “Health Education for Children with Disabilities (HLOL #89),” January 8, 2013. Podcast at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-children-disabilities. Transcript at http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11492
  • Osborne H, Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition published by Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011. One chapter is “Know Your Audience: Hearing Loss.” Available at http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9781449600532/ and most online bookstores.
  • Osborne H, “Communicating About Health with ASL.” First published in On Call magazine, June 2003. Now available at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-asl
  • Health Education in American Sign Language at http://www.deafmd.org
  • Communication Services for the Deaf (CSD) at http://www.c-s-d.org
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) at http://www.asha.org
  • Search the internet or your state’s information for advocacy groups or organizations and services for deafness and hearing loss.

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11710

Communicating Clearly During Transitions in Care (HLOL #101)

BLUEJACKETPINCarol Levine directs the Families and Health Care Project at the United Hospital Fund in New York City. Levine has written extensively on family caregiving. Her next book, Living in the Land of Limbo: Fiction and Poetry about Family Caregiving, will be published in 2014 by Vanderbilt University Press.

In this podcast, Carol Levine talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What “transitions in care” are and why they matter so much today.
  • Why communication is often difficult during transitions in care.
  • How both health professionals and family caregivers can help improve understanding.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11698

Stages of Change & Health Communication (HLOL #100)

jimandjan1James O. Prochaska, PhD is a clinical psychologist and one of the originators of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. He is founder of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, and Director of the Cancer Prevention Research Center and Professor of Psychology at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Prochaska is the author of hundreds of articles and many books including the classic, Changing for Good. Deservedly so, he has won numerous awards for innovative work about behavior change for health promotion and disease prevention.

Janice M. Prochaska, PhD is one of the most published authors in the field of social work. As President and CEO of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, she leads a team of experts in health behavior and organizational change–applying the Stages of Change Model to issues that include weight management, bullying prevention, and helping people be proactive about their health and health care.

In this podcast, Jim and Jan Prochaska talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • What the Stages of Change Model is. And how it got started.
  • Why the Stages of Change model is relevant to health literacy and health communication. Including its role in informed decision-making.
  • How listeners can use the Stages of Change Model when communicating about health. And communicating about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Pro-Change Behavior Systems, Inc., at http://www.prochange.com/elearning
  • Prochaska JO, Norcorss J, DiClemente C. Changing for Good: A Revolutionary Six-Stage Program for Overcoming Bad Habits and Moving Your Life Positively Forward. William Morrow Paperbacks: Reprint edition (April, 2007).

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11694

Poetry and Other Artful Ways to Communicate Health Messages (HLOL #99)

EM Authors LiveElspeth Murray is a Scottish poet whose background is in cultural anthropology, health promotion, public health policy and patient involvement in cancer care. She also works with the Puppet State Theatre Company on their award-winning puppetry and storytelling production, “The Man Who Planted Trees” that has toured internationally for many years.

In this podcast, Elspeth Murray talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “This is Bad Enough.” Murray reads her poem about why health communication is hard, along with ways to make it easier.
  • Using the arts to engage, entertain, and educate audiences.
  • Creating compelling health messages with poetry, whiteboard animation, videos, storytelling, and other artful ways.

More ways to learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11678

Communicating Clearly In a Crisis (HLOL #98)

suzanne 4Suzanne O’Connor, MSN, has worked as an advanced practice nurse for many years in hospital emergency departments, intensive care units, and outpatient practices. She now educates and consults with clinicians of all disciplines about crisis communication, conflict resolution, patient satisfaction, and working with difficult people.

In this podcast, Suzanne O’Connor talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Crisis communication. And why people have trouble listening and absorbing information when fear and anxiety is high.
  • Ways to build rapport, establish trust, and communicate in clear, yet caring, ways.
  • Strategies to customize information, reduce resistance, and confirm understanding throughout difficult conversations.

More ways to learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11662

Communicating Results of Mammograms and Other Screening Tests (HLOL #97)

Erin Marcus, M.D. Internal MedicineErin N. Marcus, MD, MPH, is a general internist at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. In 2009, she was one of three physicians nationally to receive an American Cancer Society Cancer Control Career Development Award for Primary Care Physicians. Her research focused on the communication of mammogram results. Before medical school, Dr. Marcus worked as a newspaper reporter. Even now as a practicing physician, she sometimes writes about health for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Miami Herald, and The Huffington Post.

In this podcast, Dr. Erin Marcus talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Challenges when communicating test results by mail or online.
  • Strategies to make this information more understandable.
  • Ways to help patients be more activated when learning about health.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast.

 

Diagnosing Your Practice with Low Health Literacy (HLOL #96)

D in officeDarren DeWalt, MD, is practicing physician and associate professor in the division of general internal medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He researches ways that patients with low-literacy can self-manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart failure, COPD, and asthma. He also looks at how practices can achieve better outcomes through patient-physician communication and health system design. Dr. DeWalt is the lead author of AHRQ’s Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit.

In this podcast, Dr. DeWalt talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Universal precautions and health literacy. How combining these concepts can help patients better understand health information.
  • A tool to “diagnose” if your practice has low health literacy.
  • Ways to prioritize health literacy problems and implement effective solutions.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a written transcript of this podcast.

Talking About Jargon (HLOL #94)

Dean's photoDean Schillinger MD is Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. Among his many responsibilities, Dr. Schillinger treats patients, teaches in the primary care residency program, and conducts research about healthcare for vulnerable populations. Dr. Schillinger is a well-published researcher, winner of many awards, and widely recognized as an expert in health literacy, health communication, and chronic disease prevention and management.

In this podcast, Dr. Schillinger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What jargon is and why it is often a problem in health communication.
  • A study showing that patients often do not understand jargon, even when jargon is clarified.
  • Recommendations about ways to more clearly communicate about health, along with a suggestion for more research.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Castro CM, Wilson D, Wang F, Schillinger D, “Babel Babble: Physicians’ Use of Unclarified Medical Jargon with Patients.” Am J Health Behavior, 2007;31(suppl 1):S85-S95.
  • Osborne H, “In Other Words…Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Other Healthcare Shorthand.” On Call magazine, April 10, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/abbreviations-acronyms

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11588

A Conversation About the Always Use Teach-back! Toolkit (HLOL #93)

2.5.13 Mary Ann Gail SuzanneAlways Use Teach-Back is a free, interactive, online toolkit for clinicians, office staff, and others who want to confirm that their health messages are understood. It helps them learn to use teach-back every time it is indicated – to support patients and families throughout the care continuum, especially during transitions between health care settings. Here’s a link to the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit, www.teachbacktraining.org

This podcast is a conversation with the three of the toolkit’s creators:

  • Mary Ann Abrams, MD, MPH, is a long-time health literacy champion. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Abrams has led the development of Health Literacy Iowa, Iowa’s Statewide Center for Health Literacy, and Iowa Health System’s health literacy quality initiative.
  • Suzanne Rita, RN, MSN, is a nurse, an educator, and the Improvement Learning Network Manager for Iowa Health System where she mentors improvement teams and serves as an advisor to system-wide efforts.
  • Gail Nielsen is the Director of Learning and Innovation at Iowa Health System. She also is a Fellow, faculty member, and Patient Safety Scholar of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with these three guests about:

  • What the teach-back technique is, who should use it, and why.
  • How to help others make a habit of the teach-back technique.
  • Features of the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit
  • Ways that individuals, systems, and organizations can use the toolkit.

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11575

Numeracy, Chronic Disease, and Repeat Emergency Room Visits or Hospitalizations (HLOL #92)

PastedGraphic-1Candace McNaugton MD, MPH, is an emergency medicine physician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a fellow in the Vanderbilt Emergency Medicine Research Training Program. Dr. McNaughton also completed a VA Quality Scholar Fellowship, focusing on issues of quality and patient safety. Her research looks at patients with heart failure, hypertension and other chronic diseases who seek care in the emergency department.

In this podcast, Dr. McNaughton talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Numeracy and chronic disease. Number-based tasks that patients must do to care for themselves at home.
  • Return ER visits and hospitalizations. Patients with low numeracy skills appear to be at more risk for acute exacerbation of heart failure symptoms.
  • What can all of us do to help? Recommendations for clinicians, patients, and healthcare systems.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11545

Health Education for Children with Disabilities (HLOL #89)

cushman_photoCharlotte Cushman, M.L.S., M.Ed., is Project Manager for the Training and Educational Resources Program at Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts. She has been a classroom teacher and an international educational consultant for Perkins, and also served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi, Africa.

In this podcast, Charlotte Cushman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Understanding the learning challenges of students who are blind, deaf-blind, or have other physical and cognitive disabilities.
  • Using tactile objects, picture books, technology, clear explanations, and other strategies to teach about health.
  • Working as a team with the student, family members, teachers, and interpreters.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11492

Health Literacy and Patient Safety (HLOL #88)

Paula Griswold is Executive Director of the Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors, a statewide public-private partnership to improve patient safety and reduce medical errors. Griswold has led many important collaborative projects that include reconciling medications, preventing medication errors, preventing infections, and reducing hospital readmissions—all while improving a patient’s experience of care.

In this podcast, Paula Griswold talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ways that patient safety and health literacy interests intersect
  • Preventing medication errors: strategies and tools to improve understanding
  • Reducing hospital readmissions: advocating for system-wide solutions

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11464

Choosing A Health Plan: Ways to Make This Experience Easier and More Consumer-Friendly (HLOL #87)

Lynn Quincy is a senior health policy analyst for Consumers Union–the policy and advocacy division of Consumer Reports. Quincy works on a wide variety of health policy issues that often focus on consumer protections, consumers’ health insurance literacy, and health insurance reform at the federal and state levels.

In this podcast, Quincy talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing a health plan. Why this task is often so hard for consumers.
  • Ways to make this experience easier and more consumer-friendly.
  • Strategies to help, including: choice architecture, cognitive shortcuts, stories, visuals, and doing the math for consumers.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Making Research Consent Forms Easier for Patients to Understand (HLOL #86)

Kristofer (Kris) Griffith is Manager of Human Research Regulations at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Among his many responsibilities, Griffith manages regulatory aspects of human subjects research as submitted through their Office of Protocol Research, edits the Human Subjects Research Bulletin and, along with an editorial staff, maintains MD Anderson’s Adverse Events Database.

In this podcast, Kris Griffith talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why research consent forms are so very difficult to write. And understand.
  • Strategies to help, including: listing side effects, using consistent and clear wording, formatting pages, and writing short summaries.
  • Useful tools, resources, and ways to learn more.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the transcript for this podcast.

Clearly Communicating Scientific Information (HLOL #83)

David Nelson MD, MPH is Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the National Cancer Institute. Prior to this position, Dr. Nelson worked as an epidemiologist and health communication scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is the author, co-author, or lead author of numerous books and over 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles.

In this podcast, Dr. Nelson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it can be hard to communicate scientific information to lay audiences.
  • Ways to communicate clearly–beginning with an understanding of your audience, their beliefs, and communication goals.
  • How to tell a scientific story using data, metaphor, visuals, and examples.
  • What to consider when weighing the “ethics of simplicity.”

More ways to learn:

  • Nelson DE, Hesse BW, Croyle RT (2009). Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press. Oxford University Press.
  • National Cancer Institute, US Department of Health and Human Services (2011). Making Data Talk: A Workbook. At http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/cancerlibrary/MDT-Workbook.pdf
  • Parvanta C, Nelson DE, Parvanta SA, Harner RN (2010). Essentials of Public Health Communication. Jones and Bartlett Learning.
  • Remington PL, Nelson DE, Parvanta C (2002). Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners. American Public Health Association.
  • Osborne H (2004). “In Other Words…The Ethics of Simplicity,” On Call magazine. Available at www.healthliteracy.com/ethics-of-simplicity
  • Rosling, Hans (2010). “The Joy of Stats,” Wingspan Productions for BBC. At http://www.gapminder.org/videos/the-joy-of-stats/

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11280

 

Using Twitter and Other Social Media to Communicate About Health Literacy (HLOL #80)

Jessica N. Rowden, MA, CHES is Manager for Health Communication and eHealth at ODPHP (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion) at the US Department of Health and Human Services. Jessica coordinates and manages health communication activities for a variety of programs including healthfinder.gov, health.gov, and Healthy People 2020. Jessica also oversees ODPHP’s health literacy initiatives, specializing in online health literacy.

In this podcast, Jessica Rowden talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ways that Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media are like conversations with your audience.
  • Strategies and tools to engage the audience, monitor their participation, and organize messages that you send, receive, and follow.
  • Resources, examples, and ways to learn more about social media.

More Ways to Learn:

ODPHD social media links:

Helen Osborne’s social media links:

Online tools, include:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11206

Understanding One Another Even When Language and Accents Differ (HLOL #79)

Barbara Hoekje, Ph.D, is associate professor of communication in the Department of Culture and Communication at Drexel University. She also directs Drexel University’s English Language Center. Hoekje’s focus is about furthering communication and understanding between people of different language and cultural backgrounds. For many years, she has worked with international graduate teaching assistants and international medical graduates in the United States.

In this podcast, Barbara Hoekje talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why the U.S. healthcare workforce is becoming increasingly diverse.
  • How speech patters differ even among those who speak the same language and come from the same country.
  • Strategies that providers and patients can use to improve oral understanding.
  • Ways to set a tone that welcomes everyone into our larger world family.

More ways to learn:

To contact Barbara Hoekje: Hoekje@drexel.edu or 215 895-2067.

For instructors of international doctors/healthcare professionals:

Hoekje B, Tipton S, English Language and the Medical Profession: Instructing and Assessing the Communication Skills of International Physicians (2011, Emerald Press).

For patients and others on the receiving end of health communication: Books, tapes, other resources on nonviolent communication by Marshall Rosenberg.

For foreign born doctors and others health professionals:

  • Resources from the website of the acculturation program of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) (www.ecfmg.org/acculturation/index.html)
  • Chapter on “Language and Communication” by Barbara Hoekje and Marta van Zanten in The International Medical Graduate’s Guide to US Medicine & Residency Training (by P. Alguirre, G. Whelan, and V. Rajput), published by the American College of Physicians, 2008.
  • Practice materials, such as Good practice: Communication skills in English for the medical practitioner (by Marie McCullagh and Roz Wright, published by Cambridge University Press); book and CD

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11178

A Tool That Pictures Pain (HLOL #78)

Kim Kristiansen MD lives and works in Denmark. He not only is practicing physician but also CEO of a company called EvidenceProfile ApS. Dr. Kristiansen’s work often focuses on pain, pain management, and pain research. He, along with two colleagues, invented DoloTest®– a validated, multidimensional pain assessment tool that actively involves the patient.

In this podcast, Dr. Kristiansen talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it is so important, yet difficult, for providers and patients to talk about pain.
  • How chronic (persistent) pain affects many aspects of a person’s life.
  • Ways DoloTest® helps patients and providers reach a shared understanding about pain.

More Ways to Learn:

To read the written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11155

Power of Stories in Patient and Family-Centered Care (HLOL #72)

Marlene Fondrick helps patients share their stories as a way to advance the practice of patient and family-centered care. This work builds on Fondrick’s clinical and administrative experiences as a nurse and hospital vice president. Fondrick adds to this mix her perspective as grandmother of a young child who was diagnosed with cancer.

In this podcast, Marlene Fondrick talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The power of stories in patient- and family-centered care.
  • Examples of real-life stories that have made a difference in patient care.
  • Ways to help patients share their stories, including the most important questions to ask.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care. Available at http://www.ipfcc.org/
  • Crocker L, Johnson B, Privileged Presence: Personal Stories of Connection in Health Care. 2006, Bull Publishing Company.
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words…Tool of Change: Telling and Listening to Stories,” On Call, October 16, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/telling-stories

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Talking About Medical Debt (HLOL #71)

Erin Moaratty is Chief of External Communications for the Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF). For many years, Erin was PAF’s senior case manager – helping people who have catastrophic illnesses deal with issues about access to care, health insurance, employment retention, and medical debt.

In this podcast, Erin Moaratty talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Medical debt: What this term means, who it affects, why it matters so much.
  • Patient Advocacy Foundation (PAF): Services, resources, and examples of how PAF helps patients with catastrophic illnesses.
  • Ways you can help: Strategies for professionals, friends, family members, and organizations.

More ways to learn:

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Animal-Human Bond in Healthcare (HLOL #70)

Alice Villalobos, DVM, DPNAP is Director of Pawspice in Hermosa Beach and Animal Oncology Consultation Service in Woodland Hills, CA. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Villalobos is a founding member of the Veterinary Cancer Society and president of the Society for Veterinary Medical Ethics. She writes and lectures worldwide on veterinary oncology, quality of life, bioethics, palliative/hospice care for animals, and the human-animal bond.

In this podcast, Dr. Villalobos talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How the animal-human bond enriches people, pets, and the environment.
  • Ways that animals help humans during sickness as well as health.
  • Strategies practitioners can use when talking with patients who have pets.

More Ways to Learn:

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Health Literacy from A to Z (HLOL #66)

Helen Osborne M.Ed., OTR/L helps others communicate health information in ways that patients, families, and caregivers can understand. Helen is president of Health Literacy Consulting, founder of Health Literacy Month, and host of the podcast series, “Health Literacy Out Loud.” She is also the author of “Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message.”

In this podcast, Helen talks with Adam Weiss about the second edition of her book, “Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message.”

Together, Helen and Adam discuss:

  • Who this book is for. What is new and different in the second edition.
  • Why health literacy matters to everyone communicating health information.
  • How health literacy is about mutual understanding between providers (anyone on the giving end of health communication) and patients (everyone on the receiving end of such communication).

More Ways to Learn:

The Importance of Empathy in Health Communication (HLOL #61)

Leslie Bank is Director of Customer Service at Montefiore Health Care System in Bronx, New York. She is also the co-author of, “I’m Sorry to Hear That…Real Life Responses to Patients’ 101 Most Common Complaints About Health Care.”

Bank has worked as a healthcare “change agent” for over three decades, always striving to assure that the patient’s voice is heard in all aspects of care. This includes her ongoing work in billing reform. In fact, many refer to Leslie Bank as “The Mother of Patient Friendly Billing.”

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What empathy is and how it helps build trusting healthcare relationships.
  • Strategies and suggestions for using empathy in day-to-day practice.
  • Stories and examples of empathy in action.

More Ways to Learn:

 

From the Tooth’s Point of View: Communicating Serious Health Messages with Wit and Whimsy (HLOL #58)

Jeanette Courtad DDS is a practicing dentist. She has worked with patients of all ages—from outreach programs at primary schools to now being the dentist at the Colorado School of Mines Student Health Center.

Dr. Courtad is also an artist with a lifetime of experience painting, dancing, and sculpting. She combines her artistic talents with a passion for educating children about the need for better oral hygiene in her new book, Toothful Tales: How We Survived the Sweet Attack.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why preventive health messages are often difficult to communicate.
  • Ways to draw attention to your message with empathy, wit, and whimsy.
  • Strategies that work with children, young adults, and even parents.

More Ways to Learn:

Texting Important Health Messages (HLOL #57)

Julie Gazmararian PhD is Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. She has over 25 years of experience conducting public health research in both the public and private sector. Her research focuses on a range of topics including reproductive health, children’s health, health promotion, and health literacy.

Dr. Gazmararian has published many articles on health literacy topics including medication refill adherence and use of preventive services. Now she is evaluating an innovative project called “Text4Baby” that brings together text messaging with prenatal/newborn care.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How “Text4Baby” is being used to teach about prenatal and newborn care.
  • Why text messaging is a communication tool to consider now.
  • What researchers are learning early in the evaluation process.
  • Recommendations for using text messaging in your practice.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Text4Baby. Available for free at http://text4baby.org
  • Osborne H. “In Other Words…Using text messages to improve medication adherence,” On Call magazine. September 18, 2008. Available athttp://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=7987
  • Archer N, Cocosila M, Haynes RB, Yuan Y. “Can wireless text messaging improve adherence to preventive activities? Results of a randomised controlled trial.” International Journal of Medical Informatics. (2009). PubMed. Web. 28 Dec. 2009.
  • Balas EA, Boren SA, Krishna S. “Healthcare via cell phones: a systematic review.” Journal of the American Telemedicine Association. (2009). PubMed. Web. 28 Dec. 2009.
  • Chen WS, Leong KC, bLeong KW, Mastura I, Mimi O, Ng CJ, Phua KL, Sheikh MA, Teng CL, Zailinawati AH. “The use of text messaging to improve attendance in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.” Family Practice. (2006). PubMed. Web. 30 Dec. 2009.
  • Fry JP, Neff RA. “Periodic prompts and reminders in health promotion and health behavior interventions: systematic review.” Journal of Medical Internet Research. (2009). PubMed. Web. 28 Dec. 2009.
  • Haller DM, Patton GC, Sanci LA, Sawyer SM. “Text message communication in primary care research: a randomized controlled trial.” Family Practice. (2009). PubMed. Web. 30 Dec. 2009.