Mapping Health Literacy “Hot Spots” (HLOL #42)

Laurie Martin, ScD MPH is a policy researcher with the RAND Corporation. Her interests focus on understanding the role of health literacy from both an individual and community perspective. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Martin and colleagues developed an interactive mapping tool that identifies health literacy “hot spots” — geographic areas of suboptimal health or healthcare that may be due to low health literacy.

A prototype is being used in Missouri. The goal is to expand nationwide, providing tools that researchers and practitioners can use to target health literacy interventions in ways that are efficient and cost-effective. In this podcast, Dr. Martin talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Health literacy from a population perspective. How this differs from an individual perspective.
  • Using a predictive model to estimate and map community-level health literacy.
  • Lessons learned to apply on a population level, individual level, and community level.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from a Literacy Perspective (HLOL #41)

John Comings EdD is Principal International Technical Advisor at the Education Development Center in Newton, MA. Prior to this, he was Director of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) and a member of the faculty of the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Dr. Comings’s research and writing focuses on the impact of adult literacy programs and factors that predict persistence of adult education students in the U.S. and Third World countries. In this podcast, he talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The literacy part of health literacy, including components of reading skills
  • The health part of health literacy, including functional skills within health contexts
  • Practical literacy strategies that health professionals can use today
  • Ways the health system can collaborate with the adult literacy system

More Ways to Learn:

Assessing Readability in the European Union (HLOL #40)

Mark Gibson MA is a Consumer Information Specialist based in Leeds, England. He is a linguist, translator, and journalist who now focuses on readability testing and information design. Building on his research in patient communication, Mark designs information that is appropriate for diverse audiences – including those with limited English proficiency, low literacy skills, and sight loss.

In this podcast he compares and contrasts ways to assess readability in the European Union (EU) and the United States. Topics include:

  • Assessing readability: How does the system used in the EU compare to that in the United States?
  • EU process of assessing readability: What works well and what does not?
  • Lessons learned and resources that listeners can use right away.

More Ways to Learn:

National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (HLOL #39)

Cynthia Baur, Ph.D., is the Senior Advisor for Health Literacy at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). She co-chairs several federal health literacy initiatives, including the workgroup for Healthy People 2020 Health Communication and Health Information Technology.

Dr. Baur is the lead author for the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy and helped develop CDC’s online health literacy training for health professionals. In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about the National Plan to Improve Health LiteracyTopics include:

  • How the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy was developed with input from researchers, practitioners, and community members.
  • Ways individuals and organizations can use this health literacy action plan.
  • A national and international perspective about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Numeracy: Helping Patients Understand Numeric Concepts (HLOL #38)

Andrea J. Apter, MD, MA, MSc is a practicing physician and Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Her specialty is treating patients diagnosed with asthma. Before she was a doctor, Apter was a math teacher who worked with students from 6th grade on.

Both as a doctor and as a teacher, Apter knows the challenges of communicating numeric concepts in health education. To help, she along with collaborators, have proposed a model to make this task easier for all.

In this podcast, Dr. Apter talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why numeracy matters in healthcare and preventive medicine.
  • Strategies to improve understanding that givers and receivers of health information can use today.
  • Thoughts about long-term solutions & need for health numeracy research.

More ways to learn:

  • Apter AJ et al (2008), “Numeracy and Communication with Patients: They Are Counting on Us,” Journal of General Internal Medicine 23(12):2117-24.
  • Apter AJ et al (2009), “Linking numeracy and asthma-related quality of life,” Patient Education and Counseling 75: 386-391.
  • Apter AJ et al (2006), “Asthma Numeracy Skill and Health Literacy,” Journal of Asthma, 43:705-710.
  • Golbeck AL, Ahlers-Schmidt CR, Paschal AM, and Dismuke SE (2005), “A Definition and Operational Framework for Health Numeracy,” American Journal of Preventative Medicine 29(4):375-376.
  • Osborne H, (2007) “In Other Words…Health Numeracy: How Do Patients Handle the Concept of Quantity When It Relates to Their Health?” On Call Magazine, http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=6509
  • Osborne H, (2004) “In Other Words…Working With Numbers,” On Call Magazinehttp://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=3745
  • Osborne H, (2004) Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/0763745502

Click here for a transcript of this episode: [Read more…]

Folktales as Tools for Healing (HLOL #37)

Wendy Welch PhD is a folklorist and storyteller. She is on the faculty of the Healthy Appalachia Institute and teaches Cultural Studies at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise. Wendy has served on the Board of Directors for the US National Storytelling Network and was on the National Storytelling Board in the UK.

Beyond these many professional achievements, Wendy co-owns a used bookstore, tours as storytelling performer and instructor, and is an accomplished craftswoman. In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about using folktales, personal stories, fairy tales, and urban legends as tools for healing. Topics include:

  • Using folktales with people of all ages, abilities, and cultures.
  • Using folktales to motivate behavior change.
  • Using folktales in community based participatory research.
  • Using folktales in your practice and getting more involved with research.

More ways to learn:

  • Wendy Welch welcomes hearing your story about using folktales as tools for healing. You can email Wendy directly at wow6n@uvawise.edu
  • Healthy Appalachia Institute, http://www.uvawise.edu/health
  • National Storytelling Network, http://www.storynet.org
  • Osborne, H “In other words…Tools of change: Telling and listening to stories,” On Call magazine, October 16, 2008. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=8051
  • Pantheon and Dolch are publishing houses that do and did (respectively) collections of fairy tales and multicultural folktales. Welch advises that if you find collections from either publisher (at a second-hand bookstore, perhaps) then you can rest assured they will be good.

The Healing Power of Humor & Play (HLOL #36)

Izzy Gesell M.ED, CSP knows a lot about the healing power of humor and play. With degrees in psychology and education, Izzy brings energy and joy to all he does – whether he’s working as a special education teacher, a stand-up comic, or an organizational consultant.

Izzy not only is funny in his own right but also teaches others how to use humor and play. He is the author of numerous publications including Playing Along: Group Learning Activities Borrowed From Improvisation Theater and Cancer and the Healing Power of Play.

In this podcast, Izzy talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How humor & play can add positive energy, build bridges, and create bonds.
  • Knowing when, and when not, to use humor in health communication.
  • Being humorous, even when you think you’re not funny.

More Ways to Learn:

Talking about Interactive Health Literacy & Oral Communication (HLOL #35)

Donald Rubin, PhD is Emeritus Professor of Speech Communication, of Language & Literacy Education, and of Linguistics at the University of Georgia. He is also senior researcher at that institution’s Center for Health and Risk Communication.

Much of Dr. Rubin’s work focuses on assessment, training, and analysis of oral communication, including listenability. His current research looks at 1) health literacy and health communication message design, 2) public health workforce development in communication to reduce health disparities, and 3) assessment of language proficiency among non-native speakers of English.

In this podcast, Dr. Rubin talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Interactive health literacy. How do written and spoken communication differ?
  • The communication environment. How physical and linguistic aspects affect communication.
  • Older adults. A research study about their distinct communication needs.
  • Practical strategies. How all health professionals can invite patients/consumers to participate verbally in their health care encounters.

More ways to learn:

Click here for a transcript of this episode: [Read more…]

Creating Usable, Useful Health Websites for Readers at All Levels (HLOL #34)

Stacy Robison MPH, CHES is co-founder of CommunicateHealth — a consulting company based in Northampton, Massachusetts. As a certified health educator, Stacy uses plain language to meet the learning needs of audiences with limited health literacy skills.

For the past three years, Stacy has been writing and designing health content for Quick Guide to Healthy Living — part of the award-winning healthfinder.gov Web site from the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. This site has been tested and developed with close to 800 Web users, most of whom have limited health literacy skills.

In this podcast, Stacy Robison talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How people with limited literacy skills, health literacy skills, or limited time use online health information.
  • What is different when communicating about wellness and prevention (health promotion) v. communicating about diagnosis and treatment (health care).
  • Ways to design health content so that Web users can, and will, take action.

More ways to learn:

Click here to read a transcript of this episode: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11757

Social Media & Health Literacy (HLOL #33)

Lee Aase is manager of Syndication and Social Media for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. There, he works with a team to develop medical news for the mainstream media. He also uses social media to create in-depth and extended relationships with key stakeholders.

When not working at his “day job,” Lee is the Chancellor of Social Media University Global (SMUG) — a free online resource he created to provide practical, hands-on training in social media for lifelong learners. In all situations, Lee makes it his personal mission is to help people get comfortable with social media.

In this podcast, Lee Aase talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “Social media pyramid” of: Twitter and micro-blogs; Facebook and other networking sites; Web audio (podcasts) and video (YouTube); Blogs.
  • How newcomers can get started and why they should.
  • Examples of using social media to communicate about health.

Ways to learn more:

Teachable Moments: Using Celebrity to Teach About Health (HLOL #32)

Michele Berman, MD is a pediatrician who has practiced in hospitals and pediatric centers across the United States. She also has authored numerous articles, many of them about the practical side of parenting.  But now Dr. Berman is taking on a new role as Managing Partner and Chief Medical Officer of the website, Celebrity Diagnosis.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about ways to make the most of teachable moments and use celebrity news to teach about health.

Topics include:

  • How “teachable moments” provide context for new learning
  • Why and how this website connects celebrity with health
  • Lessons learned that all health communicators can apply

More Ways to Learn:

A Participatory Approach for Communicating with Diverse Audiences (HLOL #31)

Linda Neuhauser, DrPH, is Clinical Professor of Community Health and Human Development at the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health. Her work focuses on translating research into improved health interventions and mass communication. Dr. Neuhauser is especially interested in participatory approaches that meet the literacy, linguistic, and cultural needs of diverse audiences. She is Co-Principal Investigator of the UC Berkeley Health Research for Action Center that uses participatory design to create, implement and evaluate communication initiatives that have now reached over 30 million people.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about participatory and user-centered approaches to health communication.

Topics include:

  • Communication challenges for both givers and receivers of information
  • A structured approach to participatory, user-centered design
  • Overcoming objections of limited time, money, or other resources

More Ways to Learn:

  • Neuhauser L, Rothschild R, Graham C, et al. “Participatory Design of Mass Health Communication in Three Languages for Seniors and People With Disabilities on Medicaid,” American Journal of Public Health. 2009;99 (12).
  • Neuhauser L, Constantine WI, Constantine NA, et al. “Promoting Prenatal and Early Childhood Health: Evaluation of a Statewide Materials-based intervention for Parents. American Journal of Public Health. 2007;97(10):1813-1819.
  • Health Literacy Out Loud Podcast #13: Len & Ceci Doak Discuss Health Literacy’s Past, Present, and Future (includes a discussion of the SAM materials assessment tool), Available at http://www.healthliteracyoutloud.com/2009/03/23/hlol-13-len-ceci-doak-discuss-health-literacy’s-past-present-and-future/

To read the written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11864 [Read more…]

Making a Business Case to Move Health Literacy Forward (HLOL #30)

David Walsh is a principal in the consulting firm, SmartLaunch based in Havertown, PA. With expertise in strategic and business planning, marketing and financial management, Walsh helps non-profit and for-profit businesses manage change, maximize opportunities, and launch new ventures.

Walsh recently helped develop a business case for Health Literacy Missouri and worked to launch them as a new, independent non-profit business entity. In this podcast, he talks with Helen Osborne about the importance of using proven business principles to move health literacy forward. Topics include:

  • Knowing why you need to make a business case for health literacy
  • Using the language of business (key terms and acronyms)
  • Creating a workable and measurable business plan
  • Understanding business drivers, goals, and the importance of focus

More Ways to Learn:

Click here to read the written transcript of this podcast. [Read more…]

Using Design to Get Readers to Read and Keep Reading (HLOL #29)

Karen Karen SchriverSchriver, PhD is President of KSA Communication Design and Research, a consultancy located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She is former professor of rhetoric and information design at Carnegie Mellon University where she co-directed the graduate programs in professional writing and information design.

Dr. Schriver’s first book, Dynamics in Document Design: Creating Texts for Readers—now in its 9th printing—is regarded as an essential text in its field. Winner of ten national awards for her work, Schriver is writing two new books: the first on developing expertise in information design, and the second on visual and verbal design moves to engage readers online.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about using good information design to get readers to read, and keep reading. Topics include:

  • Using good information design to help readers feel valued and respected
  • Being a visual detective, observing what works and what doesn’t
  • Engaging readers with contrast, consistency, grouping, and other design moves

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast

 

Applying Adult Education Principles to Medicine & Public Health (HLOL #28)

Dr. Winston Lawrence Winston Lawrence knows a lot about adult literacy education and community health. He works at the Literacy Assistance Center (LAC), a non-profit adult literacy organization providing professional development and technical assistance to the adult literacy community throughout New York City.

In this work, Dr. Lawrence oversees the city-wide implementation of LAC’s Health Literacy Initiative. He trains teachers and health professionals about health literacy principles and strategies. He also facilitates partnerships between literacy agencies and health care institutions.

In this podcast he talks with Helen Osborne about ways to apply adult literacy principles to medicine and public health. Topics include:

  • Why and how a literacy organization got involved with health literacy
  • How teaching practical health literacy skills helps teachers and students alike
  • Ways health literacy partnerships benefit both literacy and health programs
  • Resources to start building health literacy partnerships near you

More Ways to Learn:

CAHPS Health Literacy Item Set: An Interview with Dr. Carolyn Clancy (HLOL #27)

Clancy, CarolynCarolyn M. Clancy, M.D., is a general internist, health services researcher and director of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in Rockville, Maryland. Throughout her career, Dr. Clancy has been an advocate for improving the health care system. Her major research interests include improving health care quality and patient safety, and reducing disparities in care associated with patients’ race, ethnicity, gender, income, and education.

In 2009, Dr. Clancy was chosen as the most powerful physician-executive by the readers of Modern Healthcare and Modern Physician magazines. She was also awarded the 2009 William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research.

In this podcast she talks with Helen Osborne about AHRQ’s new CAHPS Health Literacy Item Set. Topics include:

  • Health literacy and how it relates to quality, safety, and patient care
  • CAHPS Health Literacy Item Set: A way to measure patients’ experience of care and communication
  • Vision for the future with health literacy as part of every practice

More Ways to Learn:

Why Health Literacy Matters: A Podcast with Many Voices (HLOL #26)

HLMonth1October is Health Literacy Month. This is the 11th year that advocates everywhere are raising awareness about health literacy and ways to improve understanding. This year, we decided to focus on stories – stories about why health literacy matters to healthcare providers, policy makers, researchers, educators, students, patients, families, and all others who care about health.

In this special edition podcast, you will hear six people share their stories about why health literacy matters. I recorded this podcast in May when I was giving a workshop at the Institute for Healthcare Advancement’s (or IHA) 8th Annual Health Literacy Conference.

This is the second of two Health Literacy Month podcasts. In this one, you will hear from:

  • Arthur Culbert, Health Literacy Missouri Foundation
  • Stacy Bailey, Northwestern University
  • Mary Ann Abrams MD, Iowa Health System
  • Roberta Dickman, Advocate Healthcare Lutheran General
  • Gloria Mayer, Institute for Healthcare Advancement (IHA)

More ways to learn:

  • Health Literacy Month website. Thanks to a team of remarkable volunteers and amazing authors, each day in October there are one or more health literacy stories posted at www.healthliteracymonth.org.
  • Health Literacy Out Loud. Hear interviews with those in-the-know about health literacy by going to www.healthliteracymonth.org
  • Health Literacy Consulting. Find out more about Helen Osborne’s work and background by going to www.healthliteracy.com
  • Institute for Healthcare Advancement. Find out about this organization and its upcoming health literacy conference by going to www.iha4health.org

Teaching & Singing About Health in South Africa (HLOL #25)

On a recent trip to Indermark (a village in Northern South Africa), I was privileged to talk with a group of community healthcare workers. They shared ways of teaching about health and nutrition. Two workers sang health songs they wrote. In this podcast you will hear them sing these songs in English, Zulu, and the native language Sepedi.

Here are photos of them listening to this recording:
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Dr. Mache Seibel (“Doc Rock”) Sings 2 Health Literacy Month Songs (HLOL #24)

Mache SeibelThere are many ways to raise awareness about health literacy. I’m delighted to share two Health Literacy Month songs composed and performed by Mache Seibel, MD.

Dr. Seibel is a practicing physician and professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA. He also is a composer and performer who uses music and song to teach about health. You can learn more about Dr. Seibel’s wonderful work by going to his HealthRock website at www.healthrock.com.

In this HLOL podcast, you will hear two health literacy songs along with Dr. Seibel talking about why he composed them. Dr. Seibel has kindly offered a free download in honor of Health Literacy Month. To do so, go to www.healthrock.com and then click “podcasts.”

Why Health Literacy Matters: A Podcast with Many Voices (HLOL #23)

October is Health Literacy Month. This is the 11th year that advocates everywhere are raising awareness about health literacy and ways to improve understanding. This year, we decided to focus on stories – stories about why health literacy matters to healthcare providers, policy makers, researchers, educators, students, patients, families, and all others who care about health.

In this special edition podcast, you will hear five people share their stories about why health literacy matters. I recorded these in May 2009 when I was giving a workshop at the Institute for Healthcare Advancement’s (or IHA) 8th Annual Health Literacy Conference.

This is the first of two Health Literacy Month podcasts. In this one, you will hear from:

  • Michael Villaire, Institute for Healthcare Advancement (IHA)
  • Cindy Brach, AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality)
  • Michael Wolf PhD, Northwestern University
  • Beccah Rothschild, Health Research to Action at UC Berkeley
  • Jutta Ulrich, Health Guide America

More ways to learn:

  • Health Literacy Month website. Thanks to a team of remarkable volunteers and amazing authors, each day in October there are one or more health literacy stories posted at www.healthliteracymonth.org.
  • Health Literacy Out Loud. Hear interviews with those in-the-know about health literacy by going to www.healthliteracymonth.org
  • Health Literacy Consulting. Find out more about Helen Osborne’s work and background by going to www.healthliteracy.com
  • Institute for Healthcare Advancement. Find out about this organization and its upcoming health literacy conference by going to www.iha4health.org

Writing Health Information That Caregivers Can Understand and Providers Will Accept (HLOL #22)

Carol Levine

Carol Levine works at the United Hospital Fund in New York City. There, she directs the Families and Health Care Project which focuses on developing partnerships between health care professionals and family caregivers, especially during transitions in health care settings. You can see this project online at www.nextstepincare.org.

Levine has won numerous awards for her work on health and social policy issues. In 1993, she was awarded a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship for her work in AIDS policy and ethics. In 2007, she was named a WebMD Health Hero.

In this podcast she talks with Helen Osborne about “Writing health information that caregivers can understand and providers will accept.” Topics include:

  • The growing interest in transitions of care
  • Writing information in ways caregivers can understand
  • Getting buy-in from a cross-section of providers
  • Successes, lessons learned, and recommendations

Age-Related Vision Loss (HLOL #21)

Cynthia StuenCynthia Stuen, PhD/DSW is Senior Vice President for Policy and Evaluation at Lighthouse International, headquartered in New York City. She advocates for policy at the national, state and local level while maintaining involvement in international efforts to preserve sight and prevent excess disability resulting from vision impairment.

Dr. Stuen’s entire career has been in the field of aging and she currently is Chair of the American Society on Aging. She is the author of numerous publications on topics that include age-related sensory loss, access to environments for older adults with impaired vision, and contributions older adults and their family and friends can make to program planning and service delivery.

In this podcast Dr. Stuen talks with Helen Osborne about age-related vision loss. Topics include:

  • The continuum of vision as people age
  • How to know when someone has vision loss (but doesn’t say so)
  • Ways to communicate effectively in print and on the web

More Ways to Learn:

  • Lighthouse International is a leading non-profit organization dedicated to fighting vision loss through prevention, treatment and empowerment. Available at http://lighthouse.org
  • Making Text Legible: Designing for People with Partial Sight. Includes guidelines and examples of effective legibility choices for anyone. Available by the Lighthouse International at www.lighthouse.org/accessibility/legible
  • Effective Color Contrast: Designing for People with Partial Sight and Color Deficiencies. Guidelines and specific examples of effective color contrast. Available from Lighthouse International at www.lighthouse.org/accessibility/effective-color-contrast
  • Making Your Web Site Senior Friendly is an informative checklist Web designers can use while creating online material for older adults. Published by the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine, it is available at www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/checklist.pdf
  • Making Web Sites More Accessible for Users Who Are Older and/or Have a Disability. Sponsored by the U.S. Administration on aging, this website includes background information on visual disabilities and offers strategies for improving accessibility. Available at www.adrc-tae.org/tiki-index.php?page=TAEIssueBriefs
  • LowBrowseTM is a free add-on extension to the Mozilla Firefox web browser to help people with low vision access the web.  www.lowbrowse.org or email lowbrowse@lighthouse.org.
  • Osborne, H. On Call Magazine, 2000. “In Other Words…When Vision Is an Issue…Communicating With Patients Who Are Visually Impaired” Offers practical tips for designing materials for people with visual challenges. Available at www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=3774
  • Worldwide Web Consortium. Available at http://www.w3.org

Selina Maphorogo Talks About Community Health Education in South Africa (HLOL #20)

Selina Maphorogo has been a community health worker in Northern South Africa for many years. She recently retired from the Elim Care Group Project where she worked with health professionals, volunteers, and community leaders to help eradicate the blinding eye disease trachoma.

Selina is recognized for her outstanding work. In 1996, she received the Community Builder of the Year award. In 1997, she was a finalist for the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights.

I first learned about Selina when reading the book, The Community Is My University: A Voice from the Grass Roots on Rural Health and Development. On a recent trip to South Africa, I had the privilege of speaking with her and recording this podcast.

In this podcast she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What trachoma is and how it is passed from one person to another.
  • Strategies to educate a community about disease prevention.
  • Using song, dance, role-play and other ways to teach about health.

 

More Ways to Learn:

Communicating Clearly on the Web (HLOL #19)

Janice (Ginny) Redish, Ph.D. is president of Redish & Associates, Inc. based in Bethesda, Maryland. In this work, Ginny helps government agencies and private companies create successful web sites through training and consultation on plain language and usability. Among her many accomplishments, Ginny helped develop the federal website www.usability.gov – a guide for developing usable and useful websites.

Ginny has won many awards for her work and is the author of numerous publications on usability, task analysis, accessibility, document design, plain language, and writing for the web. Her latest is the widely-acclaimed book, Letting Go of the Words – Writing Web Content that Works.

In this podcast she talks with Helen Osborne about ways to communicate clearly on the Web. Topics include:

  • Writing for print or the web. What’s the difference? How are they the same?
  • Appreciating that every web use is a conversation started by the site visitor.
  • Understanding your web visitors by thinking of “personas.”
  • Applying principles of plain language to health websites.
  • Using usability testing to measure how well your website works.

More Ways to Learn

About plain language: www.plainlanguage.gov & www.centerforplainlanguage.org

About usability: www.usability.gov & www.usabilityprofessionals.org

Developing Healthcare Materials With and For Village Health Workers (HLOL #18)

Curt Wands-Bourdoiseau is a physician assistant who has worked in free and community clinics across the United States. He has also trained village health workers in rural, isolated and conflict zones in Southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Colombia. Curt now works at the Hesperian Foundation in Berkeley, CA – serving as the project manager for the first major rewrite of the internationally renowned village health worker training book, Where There Is No Doctor.

In this podcast, he talks with Helen Osborne about developing healthcare materials with and for village health workers. Topics include:

  • Overview about the Hesperian Foundation
  • About Hesperian’s books, including Where There Is No Doctor
  • Materials development process using the participatory model
  • Lessons learned and shared with the health literacy community

Ways to Learn More:

Hesperian Foundation (English): http://www.hesperian.org
Hesperian Foundation (Spanish): http://espanol.hesperian.org