Communicating When There Is a Wide Range of Worry (HLOL #185)

Emilie Johnson, MD, MPH, is a pediatric urologist and health services researcher in Chicago, IL. She cares for pediatric urology patients (and their families) at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, and is an Assistant Professor of Urology at Northwestern University. In her practice, Dr. Johnson address the medical and surgical needs of children with a wide range of conditions involving the urinary and genital systems.

In this podcast, Dr. Johnson and Helen Osborne discuss:

  • Communication challenges when a specialist first meets with patients and families about conditions that may or may not be medically concerning.
  • Ways to set a tone of empathy, caring, and respect. One example is inviting patients to share their worries and fears at the beginning of appointments. And only after these are aired, then discussing treatment options and plans.
  • Tools and strategies to increase mutual understanding. These not only include the spoken word but also visuals, diagrams, and primers on terminology.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 17, 24, 41.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science: Using Improv to Communicate with Your Audience in Effective and Engaging Ways (HLOL #176)

The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science is located at Stony Brook University on Long Island, NY. As stated on its website, The Alda Center “empowers scientists and health professionals to communicate complex topics in clear, vivid, and engaging ways.”

Laura Lindenfeld, PhD, is Director of the Alda Center and Professor in Stony Brook’s School of Journalism. As a communication researcher, Lindenfeld helps scientists communicate in direct and engaging ways. Her goal is to advance meaningful, productive interactions with communities, stakeholders, and decision-makers by strengthening linkages between knowledge and action.

Susmita Pati, MD, MPH, is Chief Medical Program Advisor at the Alda Center. She not only is a practicing pediatrician but also a nationally-recognized expert in population health analytics, innovation, and system transformation. Pati knows well how important clear communication is to everyone in healthcare including patients, parents, physicians, and other clinicians.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Laura Lindenfeld and Susmita Pati about:

  • Alan Alda, and why he founded The Center for Communicating Science.
  • What improv is. And how this acting technique can help scientists and health professionals better communicate spoken and written messages.
  • How empathy, listening, sharing stories, being fully present, and other such skills help build connections with colleagues and the audience.
  • Ways these skills also help professionals rediscover their passion for this work.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 13, 24, 31, 41

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Dream Big: Making a Health Literacy Difference Within an Organization and Beyond (HLOL #174)

Laurie Myers is the Global Health Literacy Director for Merck & Co, Inc. In this role, Myers leads the company’s health literacy efforts globally. Her leadership has helped to improve patient communications in medication labeling, packaging, clinical trial materials, lay summaries, patient education, and more. Myers presents this work at conferences around the world and has authored numerous papers about these accomplishments.

In this podcast, Laurie Myers talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • A commitment to health literacy that originated with professional training, personal experience, and opportunity. And why a passion for this topic continues years later.
  • Advocacy from leaders, lawyers, and colleagues to initiate and implement health literacy programs.
  • Building on success within a large organization to making a difference worldwide.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 8, 27

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Consider Culture and Language When Communicating About Health (HLOL #171)

Wilma Alvarado-Little MA, MSW focuses on health equity from a linguistic and cultural perspective. She serves as the Associate Commissioner for New York State’s Department of Health and Director of its Office of Minority Health & Health Disparities. Her experience includes work in public policy, research, health literacy, and health disparities prevention. Alvarado-Little also is a healthcare interpreter and has helped develop numerous hospital and clinic-based programs. She is an invited participant on many national and statewide boards that address issues of culture and language in healthcare.

In this podcast, Wilma Alvarado-Little talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Culture in health communication has many dimensions. Beyond issues of race and ethnicity, includes factors such as socioeconomic status, communication preferences, and even work schedules.
  • Language includes written words, spoken words, and numbers along with body language, context, and potential distractions.
  • Ways to consider culture and language in all forms of health communication.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 7, 15, 18, 27

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Wellness, Women, and Health Literacy (HLOL #170)

Ruth Parker MD, MACP is Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics and Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.  For over two decades, her work has focused on research, education, and policy efforts to advance our nation’s health literacy. Ruth Parker’s health literacy accomplishments are many including being an author of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) and the widely used definition of health literacy included in numerous scholarly articles and national health policies. She is also a life-long athlete and has completed more than 25 marathons using the RunWalkRun® method. (Pictured in photo on the left)

Carmen Patrick Mohan MD FACP is an internal medicine physician, urban homesteader, and marathon runner who prescribes food and exercise as medicine. She works to foster change in healthcare delivery through internet technology, improved patient communication, and information access. Carmen Patrick Mohan specializes in cardiometabolic risk factor reduction with a focus on women. She is also a competitive runner and on a quest to complete marathons in 50 states and on 7 continents. (In photo on the right)

Dr. Ruth Parker and Dr. Carmen Patrick Mohan talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • The book they co-authored with Jeff Galloway, The Women’s Guide to Health: Run Walk Run, Eat Right, and Feel Better. What this book is about and why it was important to write.
  • How their practice as physicians, experience as marathon runners, and commitment to health literacy help women of all abilities achieve fundamental health.
  • Tips and strategies for podcast listeners–of all professions, genders, ages, and levels of activity—to help others and themselves become more fit and healthy.

More Ways to Learn:

The Women’s Guide to Health: Run Walk Run, Eat Right, and Feel Better, by Jeff Galloway, Ruth Parker, Carmen Patrick Mohan. Published by Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2018. Available on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Womens-Guide-Health-Right-Better/dp/1782551239

Author websites:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 13, 27

Read the written transcript.

Law Enforcement, Risk Management, and Health Literacy (HLOL #169)

Heather Schragg is Director of Patient Experience at Eaton Rapids Medical Center in Eaton Rapids, MI. She not only oversees the hospital’s Risk and Quality Management programs but also its initiatives to improve patient and employee experiences. Heather is committed to helping patients navigate and understand the complicated healthcare system.

Mitch Ross is a police officer in Milwaukee Wisconsin.

Over the years he has held many positions, including work in an Anti-Gang Unit Squad and on a Major Incident Response Team. He also is an adjunct instructor at the Milwaukee Police Training Academy. In addition, Mitch educates civilians about reporting suspicious activities and responding appropriately during active shooter events.

Helen Osborne talks with Heather Schragg and Mitch Ross about:

  • What law enforcement, hospital risk management, and health literacy have in common when it comes to health communication.
  • Effective ways to communicate when a calm situation escalates into a crisis. And ways to use words and body language to help calm a tense situation.
  • Communication tips that all of us, regardless of our profession or setting, can use to build trust and understanding.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 13, 24, 27, 41

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Advance Care Planning: Communicating Clearly Before There Is a Crisis (HLOL #168)

Aretha Delight Davis MD, JD, and Angelo Volandes MD, MPH, are an amazing team. They not only are married to each another but also created, run, research, and otherwise make possible ACP Decisions — an ever-growing collection of video support tools designed to help patients and families make informed decisions about advance care planning and end-of-life care. They both are physicians. Dr. Davis is also a lawyer. Their accomplishments are many and build on a deep and unwavering commitment to empowering patients.

In this podcast Dr. Davis and Dr. Volandes talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • Advance Care Planning (ACP). What it includes and why this topic is important to patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.
  • “Death illiteracy” and other reasons it can be hard to discuss advance care planning.
  • Tips, strategies, and tools to help make advance care planning conversations easier. These include using videos and excellent consumer-facing websites.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 13, 22, 30, 41

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Efforts to Improve the Readability of Medication Labels (HLOL #167)

Joanne Schwartzberg MD is Scholar-in-Residence for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Her career is filled with important accomplishments including many years of teaching, writing, researching, and creating healthcare policy. In my opinion, it’s also thanks in large part to Dr. Schwartzberg’s leadership at the American Medical Association (AMA) that the field of health literacy has flourished and grown.

In this podcast, Dr. Joanne Schwartzberg talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why people of all reading abilities have trouble following instructions on medication labels.
  • Ways that designers, pharmacists, scientific organizations, and others are working to improve the readability and usefulness of medication labels.
  • How podcast listeners can be part of this effort to make medication labels better.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 9, 26, 28, 37

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Best Case/Worst Case: A Strategy to Manage Uncertainty in Shared Decision-Making (HLOL #164)

Gretchen Schwarze MD, MPP, is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Medical History and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Schwarze is a practicing vascular surgeon and health services researcher who also directs the clinical ethics curriculum for the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.  Her research interests are in patient-doctor decision making for high-risk operations and end-of-life care for surgical patients.

In this podcast, Dr. Schwarze talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Best Case/Worst Case. A decision-making strategy that uses narrative, a graphic aid, and simplicity to communicate with families about complex treatment options.
  • Examples, stories, and research about using Best Case/Worst Case in practice.
  • Ways that patients and non-physicians can build on these lessons learned.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 12, 13, 19, 26, 32, 38, 41

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Older Adults, Brain Changes, and Health Understanding (HLOL #163)

Mark Hochhauser, PhD, is a psychologist and readability consultant in Golden Valley, MN. He also is a long-time health literacy champion. Among his many accomplishments, Hochhauser has researched the readability of consent forms, HIPAA notices, and patient’s bill of rights. He has given more than 100 presentations and authored over 200 articles. Hochhauser has also taught undergraduate and graduate courses on topics that include Adulthood and Aging, Human Learning and Memory, Motivation and Emotion, and Abnormal Psychology.

In this podcast, Mark Hochhauser and Helen Osborne talk about:

  • Brain changes including working memory, processing speed, selective attention, and other factors that tend to decline with age.
  • What listeners can do to effectively communicate with older adults.
  • What patients and families can do to better understand health information.
  • How technology offers hope, opportunity, and tools for health communication.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 3, 19, 22, 32

Read the transcript of this podcast.

End of Life Education (HLOL #157)

1_dk_kkKathy Kastner is founder and curator of the only patient/consumer-perspective website for end of life education, BestEndings.com, and author of the eBook, Death Kills… and other things I’ve learned on the Internet. Kastner also shares this information by speaking at healthcare conferences, blogging on health websites, hosting tweetchats, and participating in invitation-only think tanks. Kathy Kastner has received numerous awards for her advocacy and work in end of life education.

In this podcast, Kathy Kastner talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • End of life. An emotionally fraught topic often prompted by a new diagnosis, change in health status, or even news reported in the media.
  • Examples of words, terms, and end of life concepts that are often misunderstood.
  • Ways professionals can help improve education and understanding about end of life. Ways patients, families, and the public can help in these conversations too.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 11, 13, 22, 41

Read the written transcript of this podcast. 

Open Notes: Building Transparency, Trust, and Better Health Outcomes (HLOL #154)

WoodsSusan Woods, MD, MPH, is a seasoned health care and technology executive with broad experience spanning private and public sectors. Dr. Woods not only is a general internist but also consumer informatics expert and Director of Patient Experience for the Connected Care Office at the Veterans Health Administration. Her work focuses on using technology to engage patients and families in health and healthcare. One way is by patients accessing their notes in medical records, otherwise known as Open Notes.

In this podcast, Dr. Susan Woods talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Open Notes, a way for patients to electronically and securely access their own clinical notes thought a patient portal.
  • How Open Notes benefit patients and providers through transparency, trust, and better health outcomes.
  • What to do even if your healthcare system does not yet use Open Notes.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 11, 13, 2736

Read a transcript of this podcast. 

Making Personal Health Records Accessible to All (HLOL #153)

MRothberg_Headshot_hiresMadeleine Rothberg works at the Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at the public television and radio station, WGBH. Madeleine works to ensure that multimedia and information technology is accessible to all users, including people with disabilities. One of her many accomplishments is leading the Accessible Designs for Personal Health Records Project.

In this podcast, Madeleine Rothberg talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Personal Health Records (PHR). What they are and how PHRs are being used to promote health with personalized health information and education.
  • The Accessible Designs for Personal Health Records Project. Creating a model of making personal health information accessible to those who are blind, deaf, or have physical disabilities.
  • Simple tips and recommendations to help make websites more accessible by all.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 20, 23, 27, 30, 39.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

After Visit Summaries (HLOL #152)

image001-2Alex Federman. MD, MPH, is an aging-focused health services researcher at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. His research addresses chronic illness self-management in older adults and focuses on health literacy, cognition and health-related beliefs. Dr. Federman also provides primary care to adults in clinic and home-based settings in New York City.

In this podcast, Dr. Federman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • After Visit Summaries (AVS), electronic health records, and other ways for patients and providers to exchange information.
  • Language, formatting, and other reasons AVS are not yet ideal patient summaries.
  • Ways providers and patients can use AVS to increase understanding and improve the delivery of care.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 6, 9, 16, 30

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Lawyers Can Help with Health Literacy, Too (HLOL #148)

Trudeau-faculty picture-touched upChristopher Trudeau is a Professor at Western Michigan University, Thomas M. Cooley Law School. He is one of the leading advocates on health literacy and the law and widely recognized as an expert on informed consent. Trudeau often speaks to audiences of health professionals, or lawyers, or both about creating processes to not only engage patients but also protect healthcare organizations.

In this podcast, Christopher Trudeau talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why lawyers are starting to be more aware of, and engaged with, health literacy
  • How lawyers can use plain language to protect their clients while also helping patients understand medical-legal information
  • Ways that public health professionals, clinicians, and others can start working with lawyers to make health messages clear

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters: 1, 4, 12, 27, 28, 30.

Read the written transcript.

Implicit Bias: A Factor in Health Communication (HLOL #146)

Winston WongWinston F. Wong, MD, MS, FAAFP, is a practicing physician who also serves as the Medical Director of Community Benefit at Kaiser Permanente. His work includes developing community and organizational partnerships to eliminate health disparities. Dr. Wong has won numerous awards and serves on a number of national advisory boards including the Institute of Medicine’s Health Literacy Roundtable.

In this podcast, Dr. Wong talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What implicit bias is and examples of how it can affect health communication.
  • Why even those who consider themselves as unbiased may unconsciously make snap judgments based on how others look and speak.
  • Health literacy and implicit bias. Recommendations of ways to improve health communication and actively explore what matters to each patient.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 18, 24, 27, 41.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Patients as Consumers: Physician Conflict of Interest (HLOL #145)

49645James Rickert MD is a practicing orthopedic surgeon. He also serves on the clinical faculty of Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Rickert founded and is president of The Society for Patient Centered Orthopedic Surgery, a group of orthopedists advocating for the interests of patients in the US health care reform debate. He has published many articles on the same topic, too.

In this podcast, James Rickert talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Looking at healthcare from the perspectives of both a patient and provider.
  • How physician ownership of imaging centers, device distributorships, and other sources of non-clinical revenue sometimes conflicts with a patient’s best interest.
  • How patients can start being savvy consumers of healthcare services and products.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 11, 13.

Read a transcript of this podcast

Research to Practice: How Much Patient Teaching is Enough? (HLOL #144)

Mike Pignone headshotMichael Pignone, MD, MPH, is professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina Department of Medicine and chief of the university’s Division of General Internal Medicine. In addition to his numerous clinical and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Pignone researches chronic disease prevention and treatment, physician-patient communication, and decision-making in primary care settings. Health literacy is a thread woven throughout all his work.

In this podcast, Dr. Pignone talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Recognizing the challenge of treating patients who have chronic illnesses, complex medical regimens, and a range of interests and abilities.
  • Teaching in ways patients can learn. This starts with knowing each patient and continues with a team over time.
  • Valuing the intersection of research and practice to help patients reach their goals.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 6, 11, 27.

Read the written transcript of this podcast

Literacy & Health Literacy (HLOL #141)

Michele Erikson photoMichele Erikson has been involved with adult literacy for many years. She started as a volunteer literacy tutor and now serves as Executive Director of Wisconsin Literacy, Inc. One of Michele’s many accomplishments is overseeing Wisconsin Literacy’s Health Literacy division that not only hosts national health literacy summits but also works closely with adult learners and healthcare professionals to ensure that health information is communicated in ways everyone can understand.

In this podcast, Michele Erikson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Literacy, an acquired skill that goes beyond decoding written words.
  • Is reading a problem? Why, who, and what to do to improve understanding.
  • How literacy and health literacy overlap, intersect, and differ from the other.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Wisconsin Literacy, Inc. Includes information about Wisconsin Health Literacy. At http://wisconsinliteracy.org/health-literacy/
  • Contact Wisconsin Health Literacy’s director, Steve Sparks at steve@wisconsinliteracy.org or call 608-257-1655
  • Hotdogs and Hamburgers: Unlocking Life’s Potential through Literacy at Any Age, by Rob Shindler. This book includes an insider’s view on tutoring adults.

More Ways to Make a Difference:

  • Volunteer to be a tutor. Change someone’s life through literacy.
  • Advocate to legislators, business leaders and community officials.
  • Ask if your doctor’s clinic participates in Reach Out and Read.
  • Donate or become a member of your local literacy agency.
  • Ask your local service club (Rotary, Kiwanis, Altrusa, Lions, Etc.) to get involved.
  • Use plain language in all your health care communications.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 6, 13, 21, 27.

Read the written podcast transcript.

Health Literacy and The Joint Commission (HLOL #139)

Cordero 3-13Christina (Tina) Cordero, PhD, MPH, is a Project Director in the Department of Standards and Survey Methods, Division of Healthcare Quality Evaluation at The Joint Commission. Among her many accomplishments, Tina developed the patient-centered communication standards and The Joint Commission monograph Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient- and Family-Centered Care: A Roadmap for Hospitals.

In this podcast, Tina Cordero talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why, how, and when The Joint Commission got interested in health literacy.
  • What The Joint Commission requires and recommends in regard to patient communication interaction.
  • The Joint Commission’s Roadmap as a resource and framework for practice.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 27, 30.

Read the podcast transcript.

How to Find and Use Health Apps (HLOL #137)

rschnallRebecca Schnall, PhD, RN, is a nurse-researcher whose work focuses on informatics strategies for persons from underserved communities. One of her many accomplishments is researching ways that health information technology can help prevent disease, improve care, and reduce health disparities for persons at risk for, or living with, HIV.

In this podcast, Rebecca Schnall talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What are apps? What are health apps? Examples of how apps can provide real-time, personalized, health information that patients want to know and use now.
  • Tips for finding good health apps. Including how to search for what you need, what to be cautious about, and issues of privacy and confidentiality.
  • Looking ahead to what’s next in health app technology.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 36

Read the written transcript.

Communicating About Health with LGBTQ Youth (HLOL #136)

VettersRalph Vetters MD, MPH, is the site medical director of the Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center, a program of Fenway Health in Boston, MA. He is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and trained as a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Boston Medical Center. The Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center focuses on caring for youth who are alienated from the traditional health care system – LGBTQ youth, street youth and homeless youth.

In this podcast, Dr. Ralph Vetters talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What this term means, who it includes, and how it covers a wide range of issues and identities.
  • Strategies to communicate health information in ways that are respectful, helpful, and inclusive. This includes pronouns, words, non-words, health history forms, and electronic medical records.
  • How health literacy and communicating with LGBTQ youth share many characteristics, goals, and strategies.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 7, 17, 24, 41.

Read the written transcript.

Helping Teens Transition from Pediatrics to Adult-Centered Care (HLOL #132)

CDS CAC member Cory NourieCory Ellen Nourie, MSS, MLSP, is the Transition Social Work Coordinator at Nemours Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE. She supports young adults with disabilities and special health care needs as they transition to adulthood. Nourie is active in research and advocacy work, serves on numerous advisory boards, and frequently gives presentations about young adults’ disease self-management and transitions in healthcare services.

In this podcast, Cory Nourie talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How a healthcare transition is a planned purposeful movement from pediatric care to adult medicine.
  • Ways children can start assuming responsibility for their own medical management.
  • What physicians, other clinicians, office staff, parents, and others can do to help.

More ways to learn:

  • Got Transition. Includes strategies for health professionals, youth, and families. At http://www.gottransition.org
  • Nemours Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children produced a series of videos about healthcare transition. They include “Becoming an Adult: Taking More Responsibility for My Care” at http://youtu.be/cjXurYrFMZM

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 17, 32.

Read the written transcript.

Health Literacy and Hearing Loss (HLOL #130)

MckeeMikeMichael McKee, MD, MPH, is a family medicine physician and Assistant Professor at the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan. Dr. McKee’s clinical work and research focuses on health care access, health literacy, and health communication with disadvantaged populations including those who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Dr. McKee not only has a professional interest in this topic but also personal experience as he himself has a profound hearing loss.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Dr. Michael McKee about:

  • How hearing loss can affect health knowledge and understanding.
  • Assessing a person’s preferred language and mode of communication.
  • Respectful ways to improve communication as with pictures, technology, and community education.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 20, 27.

Read the written transcript.

Teach-back (HLOL #129)

Dean's photoDean Schillinger MD is a practicing primary care physician and Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. He also directs UCSF’s research program about health communication with vulnerable populations. Dr. Schillinger has authored over 200 publications about this work. Dr. Schillinger recently co-founded a novel public health literacy campaign called “The Bigger Picture,” harnessing the voices of young people to help change the social and environmental conditions leading to the epidemic of diabetes in minority youth.

In this podcast, Dr. Schillinger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Teach-back, a technique to arrive at shared meaning.
  • What to do (and not do) before, during, and after teach-back.
  • How teach-back can be freeing, not restrictive, for your practice.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 7, 27, 32.

Read the written transcript.

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