The Family’s Voice in Practice, Research, and Foundations (HLOL #186)

Sharon Cray earned a degree in accountancy and worked in business for several years. She entered the world of healthcare as a parent, caregiver, and active volunteer when two of her three children were diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Her participation now includes volunteering with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and serving on the Family Advisory Council at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. Cray is an active member of the I-PASS Family Centered Rounds Study Team, co-authoring the research paper, “Patient safety after implementation of a coproduced family centered communication programme,” published in the British Medical Journal.

In this podcast, Sharon Cray talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Family voice. A shared mental model that helps providers better understand the needs, wants, and lived experiences of patients and their families.
  • Ways the family voice makes a difference in practice, research, and foundations.
  • Recommendations for providers about finding and working with family partners.
  • Recommendations for families about getting involved, being listened to, and helping.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 6, 7, 8, 17, 24, 29, 31, 41

Read the transcript of this podcast.

 

Communicating When There Is a Wide Range of Worry (HLOL #185)

Emilie Johnson, MD, MPH, is a pediatric urologist and health services researcher in Chicago, IL. She cares for pediatric urology patients (and their families) at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, and is an Assistant Professor of Urology at Northwestern University. In her practice, Dr. Johnson address the medical and surgical needs of children with a wide range of conditions involving the urinary and genital systems.

In this podcast, Dr. Johnson and Helen Osborne discuss:

  • Communication challenges when a specialist first meets with patients and families about conditions that may or may not be medically concerning.
  • Ways to set a tone of empathy, caring, and respect. One example is inviting patients to share their worries and fears at the beginning of appointments. And only after these are aired, then discussing treatment options and plans.
  • Tools and strategies to increase mutual understanding. These not only include the spoken word but also visuals, diagrams, and primers on terminology.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 17, 24, 41.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Health Literacy and People Who Are Homeless (HLOL #184)

Samantha Wood devotes herself to serving those who are the most vulnerable and helping them fulfill their life goals. Wood is Senior Housing Stabilization Case Manager at The Haven–a multi-resource day shelter for people who are homeless. The Haven is located in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia. Samantha Wood takes pride in serving the area near where she grew up.

In this podcast, Samantha Wood talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Being homeless. What this can be like and why it sometimes happens.
  • The intersection of health issues and people who are homeless.
  • Ways that health systems, clinicians, and others can work with, and walk alongside of, those who are homeless to improve health and health communication.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 19, 24, 41.

Read the transcript of this podcast

Elderspeak (HLOL #182)

Anna I. Corwin Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Saint Mary’s College of California. Trained in Linguistic and Medical Anthropology, Dr. Corwin’s work focuses on understanding how cultural practices and communication shape older individuals’ experiences of their lives, their bodies, and aging.  Much of Dr. Corwin’s research has examined how and why American Catholic nuns age more “successfully” than their lay counterparts, benefitting not only from physical health but also mental and emotional well-being.

In this podcast, Dr. Anna Corwin and Helen Osborne talk about:

  • Elderspeak. Characteristics can include simplified speech and vocabulary, a slower rate, exaggerated intonation, elevated pitch and volume, and collective pronouns. 
  • Why some people use elderspeak. And possible negative outcomes when they do. 
  • Dr. Corwin’s research as a linguistic anthropologist. Stories and lessons learned from her year living with nuns at a Catholic convent.  
  • Examples of effective linguistic tools to try when interacting with people who have aphasia, dementia, or other conditions impeding communication. 

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 14, 19, 22, 24, 31, 41.

Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science: Using Improv to Communicate with Your Audience in Effective and Engaging Ways (HLOL #176)

The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science is located at Stony Brook University on Long Island, NY. As stated on its website, The Alda Center “empowers scientists and health professionals to communicate complex topics in clear, vivid, and engaging ways.”

Laura Lindenfeld, PhD, is Director of the Alda Center and Professor in Stony Brook’s School of Journalism. As a communication researcher, Lindenfeld helps scientists communicate in direct and engaging ways. Her goal is to advance meaningful, productive interactions with communities, stakeholders, and decision-makers by strengthening linkages between knowledge and action.

Susmita Pati, MD, MPH, is Chief Medical Program Advisor at the Alda Center. She not only is a practicing pediatrician but also a nationally-recognized expert in population health analytics, innovation, and system transformation. Pati knows well how important clear communication is to everyone in healthcare including patients, parents, physicians, and other clinicians.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Laura Lindenfeld and Susmita Pati about:

  • Alan Alda, and why he founded The Center for Communicating Science.
  • What improv is. And how this acting technique can help scientists and health professionals better communicate spoken and written messages.
  • How empathy, listening, sharing stories, being fully present, and other such skills help build connections with colleagues and the audience.
  • Ways these skills also help professionals rediscover their passion for this work.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 13, 24, 31, 41

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Dream Big: Making a Health Literacy Difference Within an Organization and Beyond (HLOL #174)

Laurie Myers is the Global Health Literacy Director for Merck & Co, Inc. In this role, Myers leads the company’s health literacy efforts globally. Her leadership has helped to improve patient communications in medication labeling, packaging, clinical trial materials, lay summaries, patient education, and more. Myers presents this work at conferences around the world and has authored numerous papers about these accomplishments.

In this podcast, Laurie Myers talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • A commitment to health literacy that originated with professional training, personal experience, and opportunity. And why a passion for this topic continues years later.
  • Advocacy from leaders, lawyers, and colleagues to initiate and implement health literacy programs.
  • Building on success within a large organization to making a difference worldwide.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 8, 27

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Consider Culture and Language When Communicating About Health (HLOL #171)

Wilma Alvarado-Little MA, MSW focuses on health equity from a linguistic and cultural perspective. She serves as the Associate Commissioner for New York State’s Department of Health and Director of its Office of Minority Health & Health Disparities. Her experience includes work in public policy, research, health literacy, and health disparities prevention. Alvarado-Little also is a healthcare interpreter and has helped develop numerous hospital and clinic-based programs. She is an invited participant on many national and statewide boards that address issues of culture and language in healthcare.

In this podcast, Wilma Alvarado-Little talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Culture in health communication has many dimensions. Beyond issues of race and ethnicity, includes factors such as socioeconomic status, communication preferences, and even work schedules.
  • Language includes written words, spoken words, and numbers along with body language, context, and potential distractions.
  • Ways to consider culture and language in all forms of health communication.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 7, 15, 18, 27

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Advance Care Planning: Communicating Clearly Before There Is a Crisis (HLOL #168)

Aretha Delight Davis MD, JD, and Angelo Volandes MD, MPH, are an amazing team. They not only are married to each another but also created, run, research, and otherwise make possible ACP Decisions — an ever-growing collection of video support tools designed to help patients and families make informed decisions about advance care planning and end-of-life care. They both are physicians. Dr. Davis is also a lawyer. Their accomplishments are many and build on a deep and unwavering commitment to empowering patients.

In this podcast Dr. Davis and Dr. Volandes talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • Advance Care Planning (ACP). What it includes and why this topic is important to patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals.
  • “Death illiteracy” and other reasons it can be hard to discuss advance care planning.
  • Tips, strategies, and tools to help make advance care planning conversations easier. These include using videos and excellent consumer-facing websites.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 13, 22, 30, 41

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Best Case/Worst Case: A Strategy to Manage Uncertainty in Shared Decision-Making (HLOL #164)

Gretchen Schwarze MD, MPP, is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Medical History and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Schwarze is a practicing vascular surgeon and health services researcher who also directs the clinical ethics curriculum for the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.  Her research interests are in patient-doctor decision making for high-risk operations and end-of-life care for surgical patients.

In this podcast, Dr. Schwarze talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Best Case/Worst Case. A decision-making strategy that uses narrative, a graphic aid, and simplicity to communicate with families about complex treatment options.
  • Examples, stories, and research about using Best Case/Worst Case in practice.
  • Ways that patients and non-physicians can build on these lessons learned.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 8, 12, 13, 19, 26, 32, 38, 41

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Open Notes: Building Transparency, Trust, and Better Health Outcomes (HLOL #154)

WoodsSusan Woods, MD, MPH, is a seasoned health care and technology executive with broad experience spanning private and public sectors. Dr. Woods not only is a general internist but also consumer informatics expert and Director of Patient Experience for the Connected Care Office at the Veterans Health Administration. Her work focuses on using technology to engage patients and families in health and healthcare. One way is by patients accessing their notes in medical records, otherwise known as Open Notes.

In this podcast, Dr. Susan Woods talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Open Notes, a way for patients to electronically and securely access their own clinical notes thought a patient portal.
  • How Open Notes benefit patients and providers through transparency, trust, and better health outcomes.
  • What to do even if your healthcare system does not yet use Open Notes.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 11, 13, 2736

Read a transcript of this podcast. 

After Visit Summaries (HLOL #152)

image001-2Alex Federman. MD, MPH, is an aging-focused health services researcher at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. His research addresses chronic illness self-management in older adults and focuses on health literacy, cognition and health-related beliefs. Dr. Federman also provides primary care to adults in clinic and home-based settings in New York City.

In this podcast, Dr. Federman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • After Visit Summaries (AVS), electronic health records, and other ways for patients and providers to exchange information.
  • Language, formatting, and other reasons AVS are not yet ideal patient summaries.
  • Ways providers and patients can use AVS to increase understanding and improve the delivery of care.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 6, 9, 16, 30

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Implicit Bias: A Factor in Health Communication (HLOL #146)

Winston WongWinston F. Wong, MD, MS, FAAFP, is a practicing physician who also serves as the Medical Director of Community Benefit at Kaiser Permanente. His work includes developing community and organizational partnerships to eliminate health disparities. Dr. Wong has won numerous awards and serves on a number of national advisory boards including the Institute of Medicine’s Health Literacy Roundtable.

In this podcast, Dr. Wong talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What implicit bias is and examples of how it can affect health communication.
  • Why even those who consider themselves as unbiased may unconsciously make snap judgments based on how others look and speak.
  • Health literacy and implicit bias. Recommendations of ways to improve health communication and actively explore what matters to each patient.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 18, 24, 27, 41.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Research to Practice: How Much Patient Teaching is Enough? (HLOL #144)

Mike Pignone headshotMichael Pignone, MD, MPH, is professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina Department of Medicine and chief of the university’s Division of General Internal Medicine. In addition to his numerous clinical and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Pignone researches chronic disease prevention and treatment, physician-patient communication, and decision-making in primary care settings. Health literacy is a thread woven throughout all his work.

In this podcast, Dr. Pignone talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Recognizing the challenge of treating patients who have chronic illnesses, complex medical regimens, and a range of interests and abilities.
  • Teaching in ways patients can learn. This starts with knowing each patient and continues with a team over time.
  • Valuing the intersection of research and practice to help patients reach their goals.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 6, 11, 27.

Read the written transcript of this podcast

Teach-back (HLOL #129)

Dean's photoDean Schillinger MD is a practicing primary care physician and Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. He also directs UCSF’s research program about health communication with vulnerable populations. Dr. Schillinger has authored over 200 publications about this work. Dr. Schillinger recently co-founded a novel public health literacy campaign called “The Bigger Picture,” harnessing the voices of young people to help change the social and environmental conditions leading to the epidemic of diabetes in minority youth.

In this podcast, Dr. Schillinger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Teach-back, a technique to arrive at shared meaning.
  • What to do (and not do) before, during, and after teach-back.
  • How teach-back can be freeing, not restrictive, for your practice.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 7, 27, 32.

Read the written transcript.

Health Literacy Screening Tools (HLOL #124)

IMG_2662Barry D Weiss, MD is a tenured professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He also is an affiliate professor of public health in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Dr. Weiss has been involved in health literacy and patient-physician communication for much of his professional career. Among his many accomplishments, he has written more than 150 journal articles, authored several books, advised numerous committees and organizations about health literacy, and developed the health literacy screening tool, the Newest Vital Sign.

In this podcast, Dr. Weiss talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Several well-known health literacy screening tools including the REALM (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine), TOFHLA (Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults), Single Item Health Literacy Screen, and NVS (the Newest Vital Sign).
  • Reasons to use, and more importantly, not to use health literacy screening tools in routine clinical settings.
  • Recommendations about communicating effectively with everyone.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 11, 27.

Read this podcast’s written transcript.

Patients Unlike Others You’ve Treated Before (HLOL #120)

Becky-1546-5x7_ppBecky Curran was born an achondroplastic dwarf. She is passionate about finding a way to change how people with physical differences, including little people, are perceived in the media. Becky is committed to helping everyone accept the differences in others.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Becky Curran about:

  • Why health communication can be difficult when providers treat patients with rare disease and conditions.
  • A patient’s perspective about ways providers can build trust and communicate effectively with everyone.
  • How to portray the diversity of your audience in print and web materials.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 24, 32, 41.

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12066

Communicating with Compassion (HLOL #118)

Dr.Beth Lown WebSize19Beth Lown, MD, FAACH, is a general internist at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, MA and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. She teaches learners across the spectrum of medical education. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Lown is the first medical director of the Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare, a nonprofit organization dedicated to strengthening the relationship between patients and care providers and creating more compassionate healthcare systems.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Dr. Lown about: 

  • Compassion. How it builds upon, yet differs from, empathetic concern.
  • Examples of ways to bring compassion into health communication.
  • How listeners can learn more about using these skills in practice.

More Ways to Learn

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 11, 24, 27, 41.

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12017

Choosing Wisely: A Campaign Helping Patients Be Engaged Consumers (HLOL #104)

Rothschild HeadshotBeccah Rothschild, MPA, is the Senior Outreach Leader for the Choosing Wisely campaign at Consumer Reports. Beccah has over 15 years experience in the fields of adult literacy, health literacy, health communication, and outreach including direct service interventions, research, and policy. Her role at Consumer Reports focuses on patient engagement around the issues of overuse and misuse of medical tests, treatments, and procedures that provide little benefit and in some cases cause harm.

In this podcast, Beccah Rothschild talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing Wisely. How this campaign helps patients, consumers, and providers engage in important conversations about medical tests, treatments, and procedures.
  • Consumer-friendly teaching materials from Choosing Wisely. These materials not only are free and easy-to-read but also approved by national medical societies and organizations.
  • Health literacy, and its important role in the Choosing Wisely campaign.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 8, 13, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Communicating Clearly During Transitions in Care (HLOL #101)

BLUEJACKETPINCarol Levine directs the Families and Health Care Project at the United Hospital Fund in New York City. Levine has written extensively on family caregiving. Her next book, Living in the Land of Limbo: Fiction and Poetry about Family Caregiving, will be published in 2014 by Vanderbilt University Press.

In this podcast, Carol Levine talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What “transitions in care” are and why they matter so much today.
  • Why communication is often difficult during transitions in care.
  • How both health professionals and family caregivers can help improve understanding.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 11, 22, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Diagnosing Your Practice with Low Health Literacy (HLOL #96)

D in officeDarren DeWalt, MD, is practicing physician and associate professor in the division of general internal medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He researches ways that patients with low-literacy can self-manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart failure, COPD, and asthma. He also looks at how practices can achieve better outcomes through patient-physician communication and health system design. Dr. DeWalt is the lead author of AHRQ’s Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit.

In this podcast, Dr. DeWalt talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Universal precautions and health literacy. How combining these concepts can help patients better understand health information.
  • A tool to “diagnose” if your practice has low health literacy.
  • Ways to prioritize health literacy problems and implement effective solutions.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 4, 27.

Read a written transcript of this podcast.

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