End of Life Education (HLOL #157)

1_dk_kkKathy Kastner is founder and curator of the only patient/consumer-perspective website for end of life education, BestEndings.com, and author of the eBook, Death Kills… and other things I’ve learned on the Internet. Kastner also shares this information by speaking at healthcare conferences, blogging on health websites, hosting tweetchats, and participating in invitation-only think tanks. Kathy Kastner has received numerous awards for her advocacy and work in end of life education.

In this podcast, Kathy Kastner talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • End of life. An emotionally fraught topic often prompted by a new diagnosis, change in health status, or even news reported in the media.
  • Examples of words, terms, and end of life concepts that are often misunderstood.
  • Ways professionals can help improve education and understanding about end of life. Ways patients, families, and the public can help in these conversations too.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript of this podcast. 

Patients as Consumers: Physician Conflict of Interest (HLOL #145)

49645James Rickert MD is a practicing orthopedic surgeon. He also serves on the clinical faculty of Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Rickert founded and is president of The Society for Patient Centered Orthopedic Surgery, a group of orthopedists advocating for the interests of patients in the US health care reform debate. He has published many articles on the same topic, too.

In this podcast, James Rickert talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Looking at healthcare from the perspectives of both a patient and provider.
  • How physician ownership of imaging centers, device distributorships, and other sources of non-clinical revenue sometimes conflicts with a patient’s best interest.
  • How patients can start being savvy consumers of healthcare services and products.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast

Communicating About Health with LGBTQ Youth (HLOL #136)

VettersRalph Vetters MD, MPH, is the site medical director of the Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center, a program of Fenway Health in Boston, MA. He is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and trained as a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Boston Medical Center. The Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center focuses on caring for youth who are alienated from the traditional health care system – LGBTQ youth, street youth and homeless youth.

In this podcast, Dr. Ralph Vetters talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What this term means, who it includes, and how it covers a wide range of issues and identities.
  • Strategies to communicate health information in ways that are respectful, helpful, and inclusive. This includes pronouns, words, non-words, health history forms, and electronic medical records.
  • How health literacy and communicating with LGBTQ youth share many characteristics, goals, and strategies.

More ways to learn:

Read the written transcript.

A Patient’s Perspective about Health Communication (HLOL #131)

RJoffe web sizeRosalind Joffe is founder and president of ciCoach, giving people who live with chronic health conditions the tools they need to thrive at work. Rosalind knows these issues well as she herself as lived with chronic illness for over 35 years. As both a patient and consumer advocate, Rosalind chairs the Patient Engagement Council of Massachusetts Health Quality Partners. She’s a coach who writes, blogs, and speaks about chronic health challenges and its impact on career.

In this podcast, Rosalind Joffe talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “Patient-provider engagement,” a term that reflects joint sharing of information.
  • Why two-way health communication matters so much to everyone today.
  • Examples and suggestions about ways that patients and providers can engage in collaborative, respectful, health communication.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Working with Chronic Illness: A blog about living and working with chronic illness and difficult health challenges. At http://cicoach.com/blog/
  • Joffe R, Friedlander J. Women, Work and Autoimmune Disease: Keep Working Girlfriend! A book published by Demos Health, 2008.
  • Massachusetts Health Quality Partners, at http://www.mhqp.org

Read the written transcript.

Talking with Children about Troublesome Family Issues (HLOL #125)

Picture of DebbieDeborah Wachenheim has been working for many years in health care advocacy. This work became more personal after her sister’s suicide in 2013. Deb now speaks out for more education and awareness about mental health care issues in general and postpartum mood disorders in particular.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Deb Wachenheim about:

  • Postpartum mood disorder and its role in Deb’s sister’s suicide.
  • Issues to consider when talking with children about troublesome, complex family issues.
  • Communication tips such as being open and honest, addressing questions that children ask, and being prepared for information that children find on the Internet.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

Patients Unlike Others You’ve Treated Before (HLOL #120)

Becky-1546-5x7_ppBecky Curran was born an achondroplastic dwarf. She is passionate about finding a way to change how people with physical differences, including little people, are perceived in the media. Becky is committed to helping everyone accept the differences in others.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Becky Curran about:

  • Why health communication can be difficult when providers treat patients with rare disease and conditions.
  • A patient’s perspective about ways providers can build trust and communicate effectively with everyone.
  • How to portray the diversity of your audience in print and web materials.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12066

Comics and Medicine: That’s Health Literacy, Too. (HLOL #110)

MKMK Czerwiec is a nurse who makes comics. MK has a Masters degree in medical humanities from Northwestern University, where she developed and teaches a seminar to medical students called “Drawing Medicine.” With Ian Williams, a doctor in the UK who also makes comics, MK co-runs GraphicMedicine.org, a website that looks at the intersection between comics and the discourse of medicine.

In this podcast, MK Czerwiec talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How comics use sequential art to tell about health, illness, and medicine.
  • Why comics are effective and how they transcend differences in culture, language, and educational level.
  • What listeners can do to find, create, use, and learn more about comics in medicine.

Ways to Learn More:

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11843

Health Literacy and Hearing Loss (HLOL #103)

Bonnie, Ranger, and Mickey at a conferenceBonnie Bartos PA-C, MHP, CDE is a Physician Assistant and Certified Diabetes Educator in the Mayo Clinic Health System. Her clinical focus is primary care, diabetes, and anticoagulation care. Bartos is a long-time health literacy advocate who uses pictograms as well as many other formats to teach patients who are visual learners, those who have poor literacy skills, use English as a second language, or have disabilities. Bartos knows the challenges of health education as she herself has a severe-to-profound hearing loss.

In this podcast, Bonnie Bartos talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The spectrum of hearing loss, including how hearing loss can affect speech.
  • Strategies to communicate clearly with people who have hearing loss.
  • Types of technology designed to help people with hearing loss.
  • Bartos’s story about how she lost hearing. And ways her service dogs help.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Osborne H (host), Cushman C (guest). “Health Education for Children with Disabilities (HLOL #89),” January 8, 2013. Podcast at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-children-disabilities. Transcript at http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11492
  • Osborne H, Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition published by Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011. One chapter is “Know Your Audience: Hearing Loss.” Available at http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9781449600532/ and most online bookstores.
  • Osborne H, “Communicating About Health with ASL.” First published in On Call magazine, June 2003. Now available at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-asl
  • Health Education in American Sign Language at http://www.deafmd.org
  • Communication Services for the Deaf (CSD) at http://www.c-s-d.org
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) at http://www.asha.org
  • Search the internet or your state’s information for advocacy groups or organizations and services for deafness and hearing loss.

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11710

Communicating Clearly During Transitions in Care (HLOL #101)

BLUEJACKETPINCarol Levine directs the Families and Health Care Project at the United Hospital Fund in New York City. Levine has written extensively on family caregiving. Her next book, Living in the Land of Limbo: Fiction and Poetry about Family Caregiving, will be published in 2014 by Vanderbilt University Press.

In this podcast, Carol Levine talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What “transitions in care” are and why they matter so much today.
  • Why communication is often difficult during transitions in care.
  • How both health professionals and family caregivers can help improve understanding.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11698

Poetry and Other Artful Ways to Communicate Health Messages (HLOL #99)

EM Authors LiveElspeth Murray is a Scottish poet whose background is in cultural anthropology, health promotion, public health policy and patient involvement in cancer care. She also works with the Puppet State Theatre Company on their award-winning puppetry and storytelling production, “The Man Who Planted Trees” that has toured internationally for many years.

In this podcast, Elspeth Murray talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “This is Bad Enough.” Murray reads her poem about why health communication is hard, along with ways to make it easier.
  • Using the arts to engage, entertain, and educate audiences.
  • Creating compelling health messages with poetry, whiteboard animation, videos, storytelling, and other artful ways.

More ways to learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11678

Communicating Results of Mammograms and Other Screening Tests (HLOL #97)

Erin Marcus, M.D. Internal MedicineErin N. Marcus, MD, MPH, is a general internist at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. In 2009, she was one of three physicians nationally to receive an American Cancer Society Cancer Control Career Development Award for Primary Care Physicians. Her research focused on the communication of mammogram results. Before medical school, Dr. Marcus worked as a newspaper reporter. Even now as a practicing physician, she sometimes writes about health for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Miami Herald, and The Huffington Post.

In this podcast, Dr. Erin Marcus talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Challenges when communicating test results by mail or online.
  • Strategies to make this information more understandable.
  • Ways to help patients be more activated when learning about health.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast.

 

Talking About Jargon (HLOL #94)

Dean's photoDean Schillinger MD is Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. Among his many responsibilities, Dr. Schillinger treats patients, teaches in the primary care residency program, and conducts research about healthcare for vulnerable populations. Dr. Schillinger is a well-published researcher, winner of many awards, and widely recognized as an expert in health literacy, health communication, and chronic disease prevention and management.

In this podcast, Dr. Schillinger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What jargon is and why it is often a problem in health communication.
  • A study showing that patients often do not understand jargon, even when jargon is clarified.
  • Recommendations about ways to more clearly communicate about health, along with a suggestion for more research.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Castro CM, Wilson D, Wang F, Schillinger D, “Babel Babble: Physicians’ Use of Unclarified Medical Jargon with Patients.” Am J Health Behavior, 2007;31(suppl 1):S85-S95.
  • Osborne H, “In Other Words…Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Other Healthcare Shorthand.” On Call magazine, April 10, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/abbreviations-acronyms

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11588

Writing About Health for the New York Times (HLOL #90)

IMG_0815Theresa Brown, BSN, RN, OCN, is a hospital staff nurse who writes a monthly opinion column for the New York Times called “Bedside.” Her writing focuses on health care policy issues, with particular attention given to the importance of nurses to quality care. Theresa has been a guest on numerous radio shows and on MSNBC’s “Hardball.” She contributes regularly to health care blogs and magazines, and even was invited to the White House. She also is author of the text, Critical Care: A New Nurse Faces Death, Life, and Everything in Between.

In this podcast, Theresa Brown talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How she got started as a nurse. And as a writer.
  • How writing for the public differs from writing for professionals.
  • Issues to consider including: finding topics, protecting patient confidentiality, and receiving reader feedback.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11508

Ergonomics–Staying Healthy When Using Technology (HLOL #76)

Karen Jacobs Ed.D., OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA is an occupational therapist and a board certified ergonomist. Her extensive list of accomplishments includes being a professor and program director for the post-professional distance education OT programs at Boston University and editing/ authoring numerous books and articles. She is the founding editor of WORK and former president and vice president of the American Occupational Therapy Association.

A primary focus of Dr. Jacobs’ research is about ergonomics. Specifically, how using notebook computers, tablets, backpacks, and other technology affects students of all ages. Ergonomics matters to professionals, too. In this podcast, Karen Jacobs talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ergonomics: How workplace tools, equipment, and the environment affects individuals and populations
  • Why ergonomics matters to health communicators
  • What we can do to stay healthy when using technology

More Ways to Learn:

To read the written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11132

Consumer Reports Health Ratings (HLOL #75)

John Santa MD, MPH is Director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center. For many years, he worked as a primary care physician, healthcare executive, researcher, and policy maker. Now Dr. Santa and others work to evaluate and compare health services, products and practitioners based on current, robust, and independent sources of information.

In this podcast, Dr. Santa and Helen Osborne talk about:

  • Consumer Reports: How it helps consumers make purchasing decisions.
  • Why it is important for individuals to understand health ratings.
  • How Consumer Reports uses symbols, summaries, and narratives.
  • Strategies and resources for listeners to use in day-to-day practice.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11118

Advocacy: From Aha to Action (HLOL #74)

Rich Sagall MD is a retired family physician. About 25 years ago, he left clinical practice to devote all his efforts to running NeedyMeds – offering information about programs to help those who are medically needy. Beyond his work with NeedyMeds, Dr. Sagall also publishes the newsletter, Pediatrics for Parents.

In this podcast, Dr. Sagall talks with Helen Osborne about his journey from being a practicing physician to following his passion and creating a non-profit organization. Topics include:

  • Journey from clinical practice to following your interests and passion
  • Lessons learned about starting and sustaining a non-profit business
  • Finding inspiration in unexpected places

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11110

Power of Stories in Patient and Family-Centered Care (HLOL #72)

Marlene Fondrick helps patients share their stories as a way to advance the practice of patient and family-centered care. This work builds on Fondrick’s clinical and administrative experiences as a nurse and hospital vice president. Fondrick adds to this mix her perspective as grandmother of a young child who was diagnosed with cancer.

In this podcast, Marlene Fondrick talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The power of stories in patient- and family-centered care.
  • Examples of real-life stories that have made a difference in patient care.
  • Ways to help patients share their stories, including the most important questions to ask.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care. Available at http://www.ipfcc.org/
  • Crocker L, Johnson B, Privileged Presence: Personal Stories of Connection in Health Care. 2006, Bull Publishing Company.
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words…Tool of Change: Telling and Listening to Stories,” On Call, October 16, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/telling-stories

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Animal-Human Bond in Healthcare (HLOL #70)

Alice Villalobos, DVM, DPNAP is Director of Pawspice in Hermosa Beach and Animal Oncology Consultation Service in Woodland Hills, CA. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Villalobos is a founding member of the Veterinary Cancer Society and president of the Society for Veterinary Medical Ethics. She writes and lectures worldwide on veterinary oncology, quality of life, bioethics, palliative/hospice care for animals, and the human-animal bond.

In this podcast, Dr. Villalobos talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How the animal-human bond enriches people, pets, and the environment.
  • Ways that animals help humans during sickness as well as health.
  • Strategies practitioners can use when talking with patients who have pets.

More Ways to Learn:

Click here for a transcript of this podcast on HealthLiteracy.com

Health Literacy Journey (HLOL #68)

Maureen Johnson is Manager of Women’s Consumer Health Information at the Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. She is committed to a patient-centered approach to health literacy and believes that large hospitals and health services need high-level support and robust systems to ensure that these efforts are sustained over time.

Johnson received a Victorian Travelling Fellowship from the Victorian Quality Council. This fellowship allows emerging leaders to conduct international investigations into innovative responses to health care quality and safety. As part of this program, Johnson recently visited the USA, Canada, England, the Netherlands and Finland.

In this podcast, Maureen Johnson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Johnson’s health literacy journey. Why she traveled, who she met, what she learned along the way.
  • The value of health literacy networking. How it extends beyond hospitals and healthcare settings.
  • Salutogenesis. A way of looking at individual health factors, not just causes of disease.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z (HLOL #66)

Helen Osborne M.Ed., OTR/L helps others communicate health information in ways that patients, families, and caregivers can understand. Helen is president of Health Literacy Consulting, founder of Health Literacy Month, and host of the podcast series, “Health Literacy Out Loud.” She is also the author of “Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message.”

In this podcast, Helen talks with Adam Weiss about the second edition of her book, “Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message.”

Together, Helen and Adam discuss:

  • Who this book is for. What is new and different in the second edition.
  • Why health literacy matters to everyone communicating health information.
  • How health literacy is about mutual understanding between providers (anyone on the giving end of health communication) and patients (everyone on the receiving end of such communication).

More Ways to Learn:

Creating, Finding, and Growing in a Health Literacy Career (HLOL #60)

Geri Lynn Baumblatt has been working on health literacy projects for many years. As the editorial director at Emmi Solutions, she creates and maintains Emmi Solutions’ interactive patient education programs. Geri is also a podcaster and hosts an annual series for Health Literacy Month on the blog: Engaging the Patient.

In this podcast Baumblatt talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How her health literacy journey began with an interest in science, graduate study in literature, and frustration with being a patient.
  • Why clarity and simplicity are needed for multimedia patient education projects.
  • Tips, strategies, lessons learned for people seeking health literacy careers.

More Ways to Learn:

From the Tooth’s Point of View: Communicating Serious Health Messages with Wit and Whimsy (HLOL #58)

Jeanette Courtad DDS is a practicing dentist. She has worked with patients of all ages—from outreach programs at primary schools to now being the dentist at the Colorado School of Mines Student Health Center.

Dr. Courtad is also an artist with a lifetime of experience painting, dancing, and sculpting. She combines her artistic talents with a passion for educating children about the need for better oral hygiene in her new book, Toothful Tales: How We Survived the Sweet Attack.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why preventive health messages are often difficult to communicate.
  • Ways to draw attention to your message with empathy, wit, and whimsy.
  • Strategies that work with children, young adults, and even parents.

More Ways to Learn:

Reach Out and Read: Encouraging Literacy and Health Literacy from Childhood On (HLOL #52)

Perri Klass, MD, FAAP, is the National Medical Director of Reach Out and Read—a non-profit initiative that promotes early literacy and school readiness in pediatric exam rooms nationwide. Reach Out and Read gives new books to children and advice to parents about the importance of reading aloud.

Beyond her work with Reach Out and Read, Dr. Klass is a professor of journalism and pediatrics at New York University and also works at Bellevue Hospital Clinic. She served on the Health Literacy Project Advisory Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics. In addition, Dr. Klass is a widely published author of both fiction and nonfiction, who writes frequently about topics concerning children and health. She also writes about her ongoing interest in knitting.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Reach Out and Read, a program to encourage early literacy and promote reading aloud.
  • Why it is important to address literacy in well-child pediatric visits.
  • The intersection of literacy, learning, and health from childhood on.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Communication from a Native American Perspective (HLOL #44)

Linda Burhansstipanov MSPH, DrPH (or as many people say, “Linda B”) is of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. She has worked in public health for many years, taught at several universities, and is involved with a lot of research including the NIH funded projects, “Native American Cancer Education for Survivors” and “Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum.”

Linda B created and oversees the Native American Cancer Research website which is used not only by Native Americans but also by people from around the world. Linda is the author of nearly 100 peer-reviewed articles and advises many healthcare organizations about issues affecting Native Americans.

In this podcast, Linda B talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Native American concerns related to health and cancer
  • Communication strategies including stories, metaphors, and pictures
  • Creating a website with a strong cultural identity
  • Lessons learned that health communicators can use with all audiences

More Ways to Learn:

  • You can email Linda B at LindaB@natamcancer.net. But please know that it may take her a few days to reply as she may be in areas with no Internet connection.
  • Native American Cancer Research Website, available at www.natamcancer.org

Health Literacy from a Literacy Perspective (HLOL #41)

John Comings EdD is Principal International Technical Advisor at the Education Development Center in Newton, MA. Prior to this, he was Director of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) and a member of the faculty of the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Dr. Comings’s research and writing focuses on the impact of adult literacy programs and factors that predict persistence of adult education students in the U.S. and Third World countries. In this podcast, he talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The literacy part of health literacy, including components of reading skills
  • The health part of health literacy, including functional skills within health contexts
  • Practical literacy strategies that health professionals can use today
  • Ways the health system can collaborate with the adult literacy system

More Ways to Learn: