End of Life Education (HLOL #157)

1_dk_kkKathy Kastner is founder and curator of the only patient/consumer-perspective website for end of life education, BestEndings.com, and author of the eBook, Death Kills… and other things I’ve learned on the Internet. Kastner also shares this information by speaking at healthcare conferences, blogging on health websites, hosting tweetchats, and participating in invitation-only think tanks. Kathy Kastner has received numerous awards for her advocacy and work in end of life education.

In this podcast, Kathy Kastner talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • End of life. An emotionally fraught topic often prompted by a new diagnosis, change in health status, or even news reported in the media.
  • Examples of words, terms, and end of life concepts that are often misunderstood.
  • Ways professionals can help improve education and understanding about end of life. Ways patients, families, and the public can help in these conversations too.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript of this podcast. 

Ethics to Consider When Communicating About Health (HLOL #150)

mbsiegel_largeDr. Michael Siegel is a Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. He is a long-time researcher in tobacco control, publishing extensively on topics that include secondhand smoke, tobacco policy, and national strategies to reduce tobacco use. Dr. Siegel is a leader in the anti-tobacco movement, testifying in support of smoke-free workplace laws and serving as an expert witness in lawsuits against tobacco companies.

In this podcast, Dr. Michael Siegel talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Hard choices to make when conveying information to the public. For instance, is the intent of your message to inform or persuade? How to communicate risk?
  • Examples of how to be honest, transparent, and clear when informing others about health.
  • Building a trusted relationship with the audience and maintain credibility over time.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Osborne H, Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition. 2011, Jones & Bartlett Learning. Includes the chapter, “Ethics of Simplicity.”
  • Osborne H, “In other words: The ethics of simplicity,” On Call magazine, 2004. At http://healthliteracy.com/2004/03/01/ethics-of-simplicity-3/

Read the podcast transcript.

Working with Journalists to Communicate about Health (HLOL #149)

imgres-1-1Beth Daley is a senior investigative reporter and senior trainer at the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR), a non-profit based at Boston University and the public television/radio station WGBH. Prior to NECIR, Daley was a reporter for many years at The Boston Globe, focusing primarily on science and the environment. She has won numerous national journalism awards including a Knight Journalism Fellowship and being named a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

In this podcast, Beth Daley talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The different forms of journalism including newspaper reporting, enterprise stories, and in-depth investigations.
  • Challenges ahead for journalists and health literacy when communicating about complicated new topics, such as genomics.
  • Ways that non-journalists can be discerning consumers of health and health news.
  • Types of stories that may be of interest to journalists.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Children, Media, and Positive Health Messaging (HLOL #147)

Dina and friendDina Borzekowski, Ed.D., is the Interim Director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Health Literacy. She also is an international expert on children, media, and health. Borzekowski’s research explores how children and adolescents use media as well as media’s effect on the health and well-being of youth.

In this podcast, Dina Borzekowski talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The intersection of children everywhere with media in its many formats.
  • Research about positive and negative effects of media on children of all ages.
  • Recommendations for developing media messages that can improve children’s lives.
  • Ways professionals and parents can help when it comes to media messages.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Borzekkowski DLG, Cohen JE, “International Reach of Tobacco Marketing Among Young Children,” Pediatrics, Volume 132, Number 4, October 2013.
  • Borzekowski, DLG, “Considering Children and Health Literacy: A Theoretical Approach,” Pediatrics 2009;124;S282.
  • Borzekowski is happy to chat about health literacy or children, media, and health. Feel free to contact her by email at dborzeko@umd.edu

Read the transcript for this podcast. 

Patients as Consumers: Physician Conflict of Interest (HLOL #145)

49645James Rickert MD is a practicing orthopedic surgeon. He also serves on the clinical faculty of Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Rickert founded and is president of The Society for Patient Centered Orthopedic Surgery, a group of orthopedists advocating for the interests of patients in the US health care reform debate. He has published many articles on the same topic, too.

In this podcast, James Rickert talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Looking at healthcare from the perspectives of both a patient and provider.
  • How physician ownership of imaging centers, device distributorships, and other sources of non-clinical revenue sometimes conflicts with a patient’s best interest.
  • How patients can start being savvy consumers of healthcare services and products.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast

Creating Videos of Patients’ Stories to Inspire and Remind Caregivers About Why Their Work Matters (HLOL #143)

2015 headshotChad Brough is Executive Director of the Office of Patient Experience at Cone Health in Greensboro, NC. While his accomplishments are many, Chad succinctly summarized his work in words he uses as his Twitter profile, “Chad Brough stands for healthcare that is more compassionate, less complicated, more affordable, and more predictable.”

In this podcast, Chad Brough talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How patients’ stories help inspire caregivers about the importance of caregiving.
  • Why patients so willingly share their stories as a way to give back and say thanks.
  • Good, better, and best ways to help tell patients’ stories. From reading heartfelt letters, to sharing family photos, to producing videotaped stories.
  • Recommendations, lessons learned, and stories about storytelling in healthcare.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written podcast transcript.

What To Do When Teaching About the Flu (HLOL #142)

Sparks photoSteve Sparks is the director of Wisconsin Health Literacy, a division of Wisconsin Literacy, Inc. There, he provides consultation, training, and coordination for statewide health literacy programs, communications, and interventions. Before Wisconsin Health Literacy, Steve held marketing and communications positions in hospitals, health systems, and taught college-level communication courses.

In this podcast, Steve Sparks talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it’s important, yet also difficult, to teach about the flu.
  • Strategies that work including collaborating with organizations trusted by the intended audience, meeting at places people already go, creating an informal tone, being interactive, using health literacy principles throughout.
  • How health literacy approaches enhance success in populations harder to reach.
  • Getting funding, measuring success, and other behind-the-scene necessities.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the transcript for this podcast.

Ethnodrama: Conveying Health Concepts in Culturally Relevant Ways (HLOL #140)

Anita Woodley - Headshot Black & WhiteAnita Woodley is an award-winning actress, playwright, producer, musician, poet, and journalist. She also is a certified HIV counselor and advocate for many healthcare initiatives. One powerful way that Anita communicates is with ethnodramas—non-traditional theatrical performances based on ethnographic research data used to educate, promote, and prevent harmful practices to overall health.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Anita Woodley about:

  • How theatric performances can communicate health messages in meaningful, memorable, and culturally relevant ways.
  • Examples of using characters, language, and laughter to teach about health.
  • Woodley’s suggestions about ways everyone (not just actors) can be authentic and inform those we care about, and care for.

More Ways to Learn

  • Anita Woodley: Award-winning Entertainer, Journalist, and Visual Artist. Read about, watch, and learn much more at Anitawoodley.com
  • Strang F, Gonzalez S, 100 Perks of Having Cancer plus 100 Health Tips For Surviving It. At http://100perksofhavingcancer.com

Read the written podcast transcript.

How to Find and Use Health Apps (HLOL #137)

rschnallRebecca Schnall, PhD, RN, is a nurse-researcher whose work focuses on informatics strategies for persons from underserved communities. One of her many accomplishments is researching ways that health information technology can help prevent disease, improve care, and reduce health disparities for persons at risk for, or living with, HIV.

In this podcast, Rebecca Schnall talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What are apps? What are health apps? Examples of how apps can provide real-time, personalized, health information that patients want to know and use now.
  • Tips for finding good health apps. Including how to search for what you need, what to be cautious about, and issues of privacy and confidentiality.
  • Looking ahead to what’s next in health app technology.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

Reviewing Health News (HLOL #135)

HiRes - STE_7127 2Gary Schwitzer has published HealthNewsReview.org since 2006. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and director of the Center for Media Communication & Health. Previously, he directed a health journalism graduate program. Schwitzer has been working in, and with, the media for many years. No surprise, he has received numerous awards for his many contributions to medical communication.

In this podcast, Gary Schwitzer talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How HealthNewsReview analyzes, grades, and works to improve journalism and public dialogue about health news.
  • Ways health communicators can help increase the public’s understanding about health issues, information, and implication of their choices. An example is making sense about screening, versus diagnostic, tests.
  • Resources and models of clearly communicating nuanced health information.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

Improving the Patient Experience: How Healthcare Settings Can Build on Strategies that Work Well in Hotels (HLOL #133)

Andrés ValenciaAndrés Valencia is a business leader with more than 10 years experience as a manager in international hospitality. He has worked at top-end hotels, including the Ritz-Carlton. Valencia now brings a wealth of customer service and business best practices from the hotel industry to healthcare. He currently works at the Patient Experience and Engagement Program at the University of Chicago Medicine.

In this podcast, Andrés Valencia talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What’s alike and what’s different in the fields of hospitality, hotel management, and healthcare.
  • Whether in hotels or healthcare settings, the importance of providing a warm welcome, pleasant stay, and warm good-bye.
  • Helping all staff better understand how to improve the patient experience.

Read the written transcript.

A Patient’s Perspective about Health Communication (HLOL #131)

RJoffe web sizeRosalind Joffe is founder and president of ciCoach, giving people who live with chronic health conditions the tools they need to thrive at work. Rosalind knows these issues well as she herself as lived with chronic illness for over 35 years. As both a patient and consumer advocate, Rosalind chairs the Patient Engagement Council of Massachusetts Health Quality Partners. She’s a coach who writes, blogs, and speaks about chronic health challenges and its impact on career.

In this podcast, Rosalind Joffe talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “Patient-provider engagement,” a term that reflects joint sharing of information.
  • Why two-way health communication matters so much to everyone today.
  • Examples and suggestions about ways that patients and providers can engage in collaborative, respectful, health communication.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Working with Chronic Illness: A blog about living and working with chronic illness and difficult health challenges. At http://cicoach.com/blog/
  • Joffe R, Friedlander J. Women, Work and Autoimmune Disease: Keep Working Girlfriend! A book published by Demos Health, 2008.
  • Massachusetts Health Quality Partners, at http://www.mhqp.org

Read the written transcript.

Why Health Professionals Should Go Online (HLOL #128)

Kevin Pho for Health LeadersDr. Kevin Pho is an internal medicine physician and founder of the very popular, award-winning health blog, www.KevinMD.com. Dr. Pho’s unique perspective as a practicing physician and health care social media leader has been recognized by hospitals, medical societies, universities, and mainstream media that includes CBS Evening News, CNN, USA Today and the New York Times.

In this podcast, Dr. Kevin Pho talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Social media: A platform that providers and patients can use to share stories, curate content, and get health messages heard.
  • KevinMD.com. Why Dr. Pho created this blog and how it has changed and grown over the years.
  • Suggestions, recommendations, and cautions about using social media to spread your health message.

More ways to learn:

Read the written transcript.

Talking with Children about Troublesome Family Issues (HLOL #125)

Picture of DebbieDeborah Wachenheim has been working for many years in health care advocacy. This work became more personal after her sister’s suicide in 2013. Deb now speaks out for more education and awareness about mental health care issues in general and postpartum mood disorders in particular.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Deb Wachenheim about:

  • Postpartum mood disorder and its role in Deb’s sister’s suicide.
  • Issues to consider when talking with children about troublesome, complex family issues.
  • Communication tips such as being open and honest, addressing questions that children ask, and being prepared for information that children find on the Internet.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

Learning and Teaching about Health & Insurance (HLOL #121)

BonnieBraunheadshotBonnie Braun, Ph.D., served as the first Director and Endowed Chair of the Horowitz Center for Health Literacy at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. Bonnie Braun is a lifelong adult educator. Her many accomplishments include authoring nearly 100 peer-reviewed articles, founding and chairing Health Literacy Maryland, and leading the creation of the award-winning consumer curriculum, Smart Choice Health Insurance.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Bonnie Braun about:

  • Teachable moments, when learners have a need or problem to solve.
  • Building a teaching framework based on well-established theories of adult learning, education, and psychology.
  • Who, why, what, and how. Essential questions to answer when preparing to teach about health or health insurance or other topics.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12071

Patients Unlike Others You’ve Treated Before (HLOL #120)

Becky-1546-5x7_ppBecky Curran was born an achondroplastic dwarf. She is passionate about finding a way to change how people with physical differences, including little people, are perceived in the media. Becky is committed to helping everyone accept the differences in others.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Becky Curran about:

  • Why health communication can be difficult when providers treat patients with rare disease and conditions.
  • A patient’s perspective about ways providers can build trust and communicate effectively with everyone.
  • How to portray the diversity of your audience in print and web materials.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12066

Creating A Health Awareness Campaign (HLOL #116)

NeyalHeadshot-SmallerNeyal Ammary-Risch MPH, MCHES, is the Director of the National Eye Health Education Program and Health Literacy Coordinator at the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Her work includes overseeing programs that raise awareness about early detection and treatment of eye disease and the promotion of vision rehabilitation.

In this podcast Neyal Ammary-Risch talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How campaigns can help raise awareness about big health topics.
  • Examples of helpful awareness-raising strategies. These include using multiple communication formats, training trusted sources (such as lay health educators), and creating community partnerships.
  • Ideas about ways to raise awareness about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

  • National Eye Institute, National Eye Health Education Program. With links to many useful resources including the Healthy Eyes Toolkit. At www.nei.nih.gov/NEHEP
  • Fertman CI, Allensworth DD, Health Promotion Programs: From Theory to Practice.Jossey-Bass (2010). Ammary-Risch wrote the chapter, “Communicating Health Information Effectively.”
  • Ammary-Risch N, In Mommy’s Garden: A Book to Help Explain Cancer to Young Children. Learn more and order online at http://books.canyonbeach.com/inmommysgarden

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12005

WikiProject Medicine: What It is, Why It Matters, How Health Literacy Advocates Can Help (HLOL #106)

photoJames Heilman MD, CCFP-EM is an Emergency Room physician in Canada. He also has faculty appointments at the University of Saskatchewan and the University of British Columbia. Beyond these more traditional medical roles, Dr. Heilman describes himself as a “Wikipedian,” serving as a volunteer editor of Wiki Project Medicine since 2008.

In this podcast, Dr. James Heilman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • WikiProject Medicine, the most used medical resource in the world.
  • Credibility, accuracy, and other common concerns about this resource.
  • You too can be a Wikipedian. And help communicate complicated ideas in clear and simple ways.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11752

Choosing Wisely: A Campaign Helping Patients Be Engaged Consumers (HLOL #104)

Rothschild HeadshotBeccah Rothschild, MPA, is the Senior Outreach Leader for the Choosing Wisely campaign at Consumer Reports. Beccah has over 15 years experience in the fields of adult literacy, health literacy, health communication, and outreach including direct service interventions, research, and policy. Her role at Consumer Reports focuses on patient engagement around the issues of overuse and misuse of medical tests, treatments, and procedures that provide little benefit and in some cases cause harm.

In this podcast, Beccah Rothschild talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing Wisely. How this campaign helps patients, consumers, and providers engage in important conversations about medical tests, treatments, and procedures.
  • Consumer-friendly teaching materials from Choosing Wisely. These materials not only are free and easy-to-read but also approved by national medical societies and organizations.
  • Health literacy, and its important role in the Choosing Wisely campaign.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11713

Writing About Health for the New York Times (HLOL #90)

IMG_0815Theresa Brown, BSN, RN, OCN, is a hospital staff nurse who writes a monthly opinion column for the New York Times called “Bedside.” Her writing focuses on health care policy issues, with particular attention given to the importance of nurses to quality care. Theresa has been a guest on numerous radio shows and on MSNBC’s “Hardball.” She contributes regularly to health care blogs and magazines, and even was invited to the White House. She also is author of the text, Critical Care: A New Nurse Faces Death, Life, and Everything in Between.

In this podcast, Theresa Brown talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How she got started as a nurse. And as a writer.
  • How writing for the public differs from writing for professionals.
  • Issues to consider including: finding topics, protecting patient confidentiality, and receiving reader feedback.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11508