Stages of Change & Health Communication (HLOL #100)

jimandjan1James O. Prochaska, PhD is a clinical psychologist and one of the originators of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. He is founder of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, and Director of the Cancer Prevention Research Center and Professor of Psychology at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Prochaska is the author of hundreds of articles and many books including the classic, Changing for Good. Deservedly so, he has won numerous awards for innovative work about behavior change for health promotion and disease prevention.

Janice M. Prochaska, PhD is one of the most published authors in the field of social work. As President and CEO of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, she leads a team of experts in health behavior and organizational change–applying the Stages of Change Model to issues that include weight management, bullying prevention, and helping people be proactive about their health and health care.

In this podcast, Jim and Jan Prochaska talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • What the Stages of Change Model is. And how it got started.
  • Why the Stages of Change model is relevant to health literacy and health communication. Including its role in informed decision-making.
  • How listeners can use the Stages of Change Model when communicating about health. And communicating about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Pro-Change Behavior Systems, Inc., at http://www.prochange.com/elearning
  • Prochaska JO, Norcorss J, DiClemente C. Changing for Good: A Revolutionary Six-Stage Program for Overcoming Bad Habits and Moving Your Life Positively Forward. William Morrow Paperbacks: Reprint edition (April, 2007).

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11694

Poetry and Other Artful Ways to Communicate Health Messages (HLOL #99)

EM Authors LiveElspeth Murray is a Scottish poet whose background is in cultural anthropology, health promotion, public health policy and patient involvement in cancer care. She also works with the Puppet State Theatre Company on their award-winning puppetry and storytelling production, “The Man Who Planted Trees” that has toured internationally for many years.

In this podcast, Elspeth Murray talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “This is Bad Enough.” Murray reads her poem about why health communication is hard, along with ways to make it easier.
  • Using the arts to engage, entertain, and educate audiences.
  • Creating compelling health messages with poetry, whiteboard animation, videos, storytelling, and other artful ways.

More ways to learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11678

Communicating Clearly In a Crisis (HLOL #98)

suzanne 4Suzanne O’Connor, MSN, has worked as an advanced practice nurse for many years in hospital emergency departments, intensive care units, and outpatient practices. She now educates and consults with clinicians of all disciplines about crisis communication, conflict resolution, patient satisfaction, and working with difficult people.

In this podcast, Suzanne O’Connor talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Crisis communication. And why people have trouble listening and absorbing information when fear and anxiety is high.
  • Ways to build rapport, establish trust, and communicate in clear, yet caring, ways.
  • Strategies to customize information, reduce resistance, and confirm understanding throughout difficult conversations.

More ways to learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11662

Communicating Results of Mammograms and Other Screening Tests (HLOL #97)

Erin Marcus, M.D. Internal MedicineErin N. Marcus, MD, MPH, is a general internist at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. In 2009, she was one of three physicians nationally to receive an American Cancer Society Cancer Control Career Development Award for Primary Care Physicians. Her research focused on the communication of mammogram results. Before medical school, Dr. Marcus worked as a newspaper reporter. Even now as a practicing physician, she sometimes writes about health for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Miami Herald, and The Huffington Post.

In this podcast, Dr. Erin Marcus talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Challenges when communicating test results by mail or online.
  • Strategies to make this information more understandable.
  • Ways to help patients be more activated when learning about health.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast.

 

Diagnosing Your Practice with Low Health Literacy (HLOL #96)

D in officeDarren DeWalt, MD, is practicing physician and associate professor in the division of general internal medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He researches ways that patients with low-literacy can self-manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart failure, COPD, and asthma. He also looks at how practices can achieve better outcomes through patient-physician communication and health system design. Dr. DeWalt is the lead author of AHRQ’s Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit.

In this podcast, Dr. DeWalt talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Universal precautions and health literacy. How combining these concepts can help patients better understand health information.
  • A tool to “diagnose” if your practice has low health literacy.
  • Ways to prioritize health literacy problems and implement effective solutions.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a written transcript of this podcast.

How Visual Cues Help Readers Read (HLOL #95)

JosiahFiskAugust2012Josiah Fisk is founder and president of More Carrot, a firm that combines plain language with information design to create simplified, user-centric documents. While Fisk often works on consumer financial products, he also has experience with healthcare providers, software companies, and the IRS. More Carrot is a global company with offices in Boston and Luxembourg.

In this podcast, Josiah Fisk talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How information design improves readability and navigation.
  • Ways that visual cues make it easier for readers to complete forms and other business or informational documents.
  • Suggestions about using photos, spacing, sub-headings, and other design elements in healthcare documents.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11603

Talking About Jargon (HLOL #94)

Dean's photoDean Schillinger MD is Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. Among his many responsibilities, Dr. Schillinger treats patients, teaches in the primary care residency program, and conducts research about healthcare for vulnerable populations. Dr. Schillinger is a well-published researcher, winner of many awards, and widely recognized as an expert in health literacy, health communication, and chronic disease prevention and management.

In this podcast, Dr. Schillinger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What jargon is and why it is often a problem in health communication.
  • A study showing that patients often do not understand jargon, even when jargon is clarified.
  • Recommendations about ways to more clearly communicate about health, along with a suggestion for more research.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Castro CM, Wilson D, Wang F, Schillinger D, “Babel Babble: Physicians’ Use of Unclarified Medical Jargon with Patients.” Am J Health Behavior, 2007;31(suppl 1):S85-S95.
  • Osborne H, “In Other Words…Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Other Healthcare Shorthand.” On Call magazine, April 10, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/abbreviations-acronyms

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11588

A Conversation About the Always Use Teach-back! Toolkit (HLOL #93)

2.5.13 Mary Ann Gail SuzanneAlways Use Teach-Back is a free, interactive, online toolkit for clinicians, office staff, and others who want to confirm that their health messages are understood. It helps them learn to use teach-back every time it is indicated – to support patients and families throughout the care continuum, especially during transitions between health care settings. Here’s a link to the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit, www.teachbacktraining.org

This podcast is a conversation with the three of the toolkit’s creators:

  • Mary Ann Abrams, MD, MPH, is a long-time health literacy champion. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Abrams has led the development of Health Literacy Iowa, Iowa’s Statewide Center for Health Literacy, and Iowa Health System’s health literacy quality initiative.
  • Suzanne Rita, RN, MSN, is a nurse, an educator, and the Improvement Learning Network Manager for Iowa Health System where she mentors improvement teams and serves as an advisor to system-wide efforts.
  • Gail Nielsen is the Director of Learning and Innovation at Iowa Health System. She also is a Fellow, faculty member, and Patient Safety Scholar of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with these three guests about:

  • What the teach-back technique is, who should use it, and why.
  • How to help others make a habit of the teach-back technique.
  • Features of the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit
  • Ways that individuals, systems, and organizations can use the toolkit.

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11575

Numeracy, Chronic Disease, and Repeat Emergency Room Visits or Hospitalizations (HLOL #92)

PastedGraphic-1Candace McNaugton MD, MPH, is an emergency medicine physician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a fellow in the Vanderbilt Emergency Medicine Research Training Program. Dr. McNaughton also completed a VA Quality Scholar Fellowship, focusing on issues of quality and patient safety. Her research looks at patients with heart failure, hypertension and other chronic diseases who seek care in the emergency department.

In this podcast, Dr. McNaughton talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Numeracy and chronic disease. Number-based tasks that patients must do to care for themselves at home.
  • Return ER visits and hospitalizations. Patients with low numeracy skills appear to be at more risk for acute exacerbation of heart failure symptoms.
  • What can all of us do to help? Recommendations for clinicians, patients, and healthcare systems.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11545

Health Education for Children with Disabilities (HLOL #89)

cushman_photoCharlotte Cushman, M.L.S., M.Ed., is Project Manager for the Training and Educational Resources Program at Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts. She has been a classroom teacher and an international educational consultant for Perkins, and also served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi, Africa.

In this podcast, Charlotte Cushman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Understanding the learning challenges of students who are blind, deaf-blind, or have other physical and cognitive disabilities.
  • Using tactile objects, picture books, technology, clear explanations, and other strategies to teach about health.
  • Working as a team with the student, family members, teachers, and interpreters.

More Ways to Learn:

To read a transcript of this podcast, click here: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11492

Dr. Rima Rudd Talks About the Health Literacy Burden in Healthcare (HLOL #15)

Dr. Rima Rudd is Senior Lecturer on Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her work centers on health communication and the design and evaluation of public health programs. She teaches courses on innovative strategies in health education, program planning and evaluation, and health literacy.

Dr. Rudd is widely recognized as a leader in health literacy – helping to shape both the research and practice agenda in the US, Canada, and Europe. Dr. Rudd works closely with the adult education, public health, oral health, and medical sectors. Her current research looks at literacy-related disparities and literacy-related barriers to health programs, services, and care. Her Harvard website on health literacy serves scholars and practitioners.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about the health literacy burden in healthcare. Topics include:

  • Literacy-related disparities and barriers as they relate to healthcare
  • Deconstructing healthcare language, instructions, and activities
  • Literacy demands in chronic disease management, prevention, and navigation
  • Why it’s time to reconsider the definition of health literacy

More Ways to Learn:

  • Harvard School of Public Health, Health Literacy Studies. www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy
  • Communicating Health: Priorities and Strategies for Progress (2003), US Department of Health and Human Services & Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.  Dr. Rudd wrote the chapter about health literacy. Available at http://odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov/projects/healthcomm/
  • Literacy and Health in America (2004), Educational Testing Services. Dr. Rudd is one of the authors. Available at http://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/PICHEATH.pdf
  • National Center for the Study of Adult Literacy and Learning (NCSALL), http://www.ncsall.net
  • Nielsen-Bohlman L, Panzer AM, Kindig DA, (ed), 2004. Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion. The National Academies Press: Washington DC. Dr. Rudd was a member of the Institute of Medicine committee as well as writer/contributor to the book. Available at http://books.nap.edu

To read a written transcript, click http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11705

Len & Ceci Doak Discuss Health Literacy’s Past, Present and Future (HLOL #13)

Cecelia (Ceci) and Leonard (Len) Doak are a husband and wife team who, for over 30 years, helped lead the way to health literacy. Their book, workshops, and articles have inspired advocates everywhere to improve health understanding.

Ceci started as a commissioned officer in the US Public Health Service. During her more 20 years there, Ceci developed and led numerous health education programs. In fact, she received a commendation from the Surgeon General for her work educating the public about cancer.

Len comes to health literacy via adult education, volunteering for many years as a tutor of non-readers. Len’s first career was as a Navy engineer and among his many accomplishments he helped simplify instructions for crews working on ships and submarines.

Len & Ceci co-authored the award-winning book, Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills. In their non-profit business Patient Learning Associates, Inc., Len and Ceci have written guidelines for many important projects and analyzed the suitability of over 2,000 healthcare materials in virtually all formats. They have presented at more than 200 health literacy workshops, training thousands of health professionals in all disciplines.

In this Health Literacy Out Loud podcast, they talk with Helen Osborne about the past, present, and future of health literacy. Topics include:

  • How health literacy began more than 30 years ago
  • Why health literacy was important then and is even more so today
  • Strategies to improve communication and assess if messages are understood
  • Ceci & Len Doak’s vision for health literacy in the future

More ways to learn:

  • Doak, Doak, & Root, Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills, Second Edition. 1996. Available for free at Harvard University School of Public Health’s Health Literacy Studies website, http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/resources/doak-book/
  • Houts, Doak, Doak, Lascalzo. “The role of pictures in improving health communication:  A review of research on the benefits of pictures on attention, comprehension, recall, and adherence.”  Patient Education and Counseling, 61 (2006) 173-190, 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words…Can They Understand? Testing Patient Education Materials With Intended Readers,” On Call Magazine, Nov 2001. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=3811

Click here for a transcript of this episode: http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=1169 [Read more…]