Using Body and Voice to Communicate About Health (HLOL #112)

TM-close-hi-resTom Mucciolo is President of MediaNet, Inc., a presentation skills company based in New York City. For many years, Tom has been helping leaders effectively communicate their messages using scripting, visual design, and delivery skills. He also is on the faculty at New York University. Tom writes extensively about teaching and presentation effectiveness and is co-author of the book, A Guide to Better Teaching.

In this podcast, Tom Mucciolo talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Conversation versus presentation: Why talking about health is more than just words.
  • Making the most of body language with proximity, openness, and invitation.
  • Using tone of voice to establish presence and avoid distractions.

More Ways to Learn:

  • MediaNet: A Presentation Skills Company. At http://www.medianet-ny.com
  • Visually Speaking blog. At http://medianet-ny.com/wordpress/
  • Jahangiri L, Mucciolo T (2012), A Guide to Better Teaching: Skills, Advice, and Evaluation for College and University Professors. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 24, 40.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Dentists and Patients: How to Communicate Clearly (HLOL #111)

Leila-Jahangiri-profile-image 2013Dr. Leila Jahangiri is a dentist, clinical professor and department chair in Prosthodontics at New York University College of Dentistry. NYU is the largest dental school in the United States and Dr. Jahangiri has vast experience in teaching and patient care. She focuses a considerable amount of time researching effective communications and is co-author of the book, A Guide to Better Teaching.

In this podcast, Dr. Jahangiri talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How good communication starts even before the patient sits in a dental chair.
  • Ways to help reduce a patient’s anxiety and fear of pain or the unknown.
  • Strategies that dentists, medical professionals, and patients can use to improve communication.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Jahangiri L, Mucciolo T (2012), A Guide to Better Teaching: Skills, Advice, and Evaluation for College and University Professors. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • ADA (American Dental Association). With resources for professionals and the public. At http://www.ada.org.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 7, 19, 24, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Health Literacy and Pediatrics (HLOL #107)

Cronan_ Kate DSC6430Kate Cronan MD is a Pediatric Emergency Medicine physician, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Jefferson Medical College, Director of Health Content Integration for the Nemours Children’s Health Media Center, and Senior Editor for KidsHealth.org. She is also an active and enthusiastic health literacy champion who co-chairs the Language Proficiency and Health Literacy Committee at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware.

In this podcast, Dr. Kate Cronan talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Health literacy issues to consider when communicating with children, along with their parents or caregivers.
  • Strategies to help set a positive tone, put children at ease, and communicate medical information in ways they can understand.
  • Choosing words, using pictures, and otherwise being clear when teaching children about health and illness.

More Ways to Learn:

  • KidsHealth from Nemours. Communicating complex medical information in ways that parents, kids, and teens can understand. At http://kidshealth.org
  • Abrams MA, Dreyer BP, (2009) Plain Language Pediatrics: Health Literacy Strategies and Communication Resources for Common Pediatric Topics. Available as an eBook from AAP, at http://ebooks.aap.org/product/plain-language-pediatrics

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 13, 17, 27, 32.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Health Literacy and Hearing Loss (HLOL #103)

Bonnie, Ranger, and Mickey at a conferenceBonnie Bartos PA-C, MHP, CDE is a Physician Assistant and Certified Diabetes Educator in the Mayo Clinic Health System. Her clinical focus is primary care, diabetes, and anticoagulation care. Bartos is a long-time health literacy advocate who uses pictograms as well as many other formats to teach patients who are visual learners, those who have poor literacy skills, use English as a second language, or have disabilities. Bartos knows the challenges of health education as she herself has a severe-to-profound hearing loss.

In this podcast, Bonnie Bartos talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The spectrum of hearing loss, including how hearing loss can affect speech.
  • Strategies to communicate clearly with people who have hearing loss.
  • Types of technology designed to help people with hearing loss.
  • Bartos’s story about how she lost hearing. And ways her service dogs help.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Osborne H (host), Cushman C (guest). “Health Education for Children with Disabilities (HLOL #89),” January 8, 2013. Podcast at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-children-disabilities. Transcript at http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11492
  • Osborne H, Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition published by Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011. One chapter is “Know Your Audience: Hearing Loss.” Available at http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9781449600532/ and most online bookstores.
  • Osborne H, “Communicating About Health with ASL.” First published in On Call magazine, June 2003. Now available at http://healthliteracy.com/hlol-asl
  • Health Education in American Sign Language at http://www.deafmd.org
  • Communication Services for the Deaf (CSD) at http://www.c-s-d.org
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) at http://www.asha.org
  • Search the internet or your state’s information for advocacy groups or organizations and services for deafness and hearing loss.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 20, 36.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Communicating Clearly During Transitions in Care (HLOL #101)

BLUEJACKETPINCarol Levine directs the Families and Health Care Project at the United Hospital Fund in New York City. Levine has written extensively on family caregiving. Her next book, Living in the Land of Limbo: Fiction and Poetry about Family Caregiving, will be published in 2014 by Vanderbilt University Press.

In this podcast, Carol Levine talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What “transitions in care” are and why they matter so much today.
  • Why communication is often difficult during transitions in care.
  • How both health professionals and family caregivers can help improve understanding.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 11, 22, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Poetry and Other Artful Ways to Communicate Health Messages (HLOL #99)

EM Authors LiveElspeth Murray is a Scottish poet whose background is in cultural anthropology, health promotion, public health policy and patient involvement in cancer care. She also works with the Puppet State Theatre Company on their award-winning puppetry and storytelling production, “The Man Who Planted Trees” that has toured internationally for many years.

In this podcast, Elspeth Murray talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “This is Bad Enough.” Murray reads her poem about why health communication is hard, along with ways to make it easier.
  • Using the arts to engage, entertain, and educate audiences.
  • Creating compelling health messages with poetry, whiteboard animation, videos, storytelling, and other artful ways.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 28, 32, 40, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Communicating Clearly In a Crisis (HLOL #98)

suzanne 4Suzanne O’Connor, MSN, has worked as an advanced practice nurse for many years in hospital emergency departments, intensive care units, and outpatient practices. She now educates and consults with clinicians of all disciplines about crisis communication, conflict resolution, patient satisfaction, and working with difficult people.

In this podcast, Suzanne O’Connor talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Crisis communication. And why people have trouble listening and absorbing information when fear and anxiety is high.
  • Ways to build rapport, establish trust, and communicate in clear, yet caring, ways.
  • Strategies to customize information, reduce resistance, and confirm understanding throughout difficult conversations.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 13, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Talking About Jargon (HLOL #94)

Dean's photoDean Schillinger MD is Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. Among his many responsibilities, Dr. Schillinger treats patients, teaches in the primary care residency program, and conducts research about healthcare for vulnerable populations. Dr. Schillinger is a well-published researcher, winner of many awards, and widely recognized as an expert in health literacy, health communication, and chronic disease prevention and management.

In this podcast, Dr. Schillinger talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What jargon is and why it is often a problem in health communication.
  • A study showing that patients often do not understand jargon, even when jargon is clarified.
  • Recommendations about ways to more clearly communicate about health, along with a suggestion for more research.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Castro CM, Wilson D, Wang F, Schillinger D, “Babel Babble: Physicians’ Use of Unclarified Medical Jargon with Patients.” Am J Health Behavior, 2007;31(suppl 1):S85-S95.
  • Osborne H, “In Other Words…Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Other Healthcare Shorthand.” On Call magazine, April 10, 2008. Available at http://healthliteracy.com/abbreviations-acronyms

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 16, 25.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

A Conversation About the Always Use Teach-back! Toolkit (HLOL #93)

2.5.13 Mary Ann Gail SuzanneAlways Use Teach-Back is a free, interactive, online toolkit for clinicians, office staff, and others who want to confirm that their health messages are understood. It helps them learn to use teach-back every time it is indicated – to support patients and families throughout the care continuum, especially during transitions between health care settings. Here’s a link to the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit, www.teachbacktraining.org

This podcast is a conversation with the three of the toolkit’s creators:

  • Mary Ann Abrams, MD, MPH, is a long-time health literacy champion. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Abrams has led the development of Health Literacy Iowa, Iowa’s Statewide Center for Health Literacy, and Iowa Health System’s health literacy quality initiative.
  • Suzanne Rita, RN, MSN, is a nurse, an educator, and the Improvement Learning Network Manager for Iowa Health System where she mentors improvement teams and serves as an advisor to system-wide efforts.
  • Gail Nielsen is the Director of Learning and Innovation at Iowa Health System. She also is a Fellow, faculty member, and Patient Safety Scholar of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with these three guests about:

  • What the teach-back technique is, who should use it, and why.
  • How to help others make a habit of the teach-back technique.
  • Features of the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit
  • Ways that individuals, systems, and organizations can use the toolkit.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 7, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Numeracy, Chronic Disease, and Repeat Emergency Room Visits or Hospitalizations (HLOL #92)

PastedGraphic-1Candace McNaugton MD, MPH, is an emergency medicine physician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a fellow in the Vanderbilt Emergency Medicine Research Training Program. Dr. McNaughton also completed a VA Quality Scholar Fellowship, focusing on issues of quality and patient safety. Her research looks at patients with heart failure, hypertension and other chronic diseases who seek care in the emergency department.

In this podcast, Dr. McNaughton talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Numeracy and chronic disease. Number-based tasks that patients must do to care for themselves at home.
  • Return ER visits and hospitalizations. Patients with low numeracy skills appear to be at more risk for acute exacerbation of heart failure symptoms.
  • What can all of us do to help? Recommendations for clinicians, patients, and healthcare systems.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 5, 7, 26.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Understanding One Another Even When Language and Accents Differ (HLOL #79)

Barbara Hoekje, Ph.D, is associate professor of communication in the Department of Culture and Communication at Drexel University. She also directs Drexel University’s English Language Center. Hoekje’s focus is about furthering communication and understanding between people of different language and cultural backgrounds. For many years, she has worked with international graduate teaching assistants and international medical graduates in the United States.

In this podcast, Barbara Hoekje talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why the U.S. healthcare workforce is becoming increasingly diverse.
  • How speech patters differ even among those who speak the same language and come from the same country.
  • Strategies that providers and patients can use to improve oral understanding.
  • Ways to set a tone that welcomes everyone into our larger world family.

More ways to learn:

To contact Barbara Hoekje: Hoekje@drexel.edu or 215 895-2067.

For instructors of international doctors/healthcare professionals:

Hoekje B, Tipton S, English Language and the Medical Profession: Instructing and Assessing the Communication Skills of International Physicians (2011, Emerald Press).

For patients and others on the receiving end of health communication: Books, tapes, other resources on nonviolent communication by Marshall Rosenberg.

For foreign born doctors and others health professionals:

  • Resources from the website of the acculturation program of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) (www.ecfmg.org/acculturation/index.html)
  • Chapter on “Language and Communication” by Barbara Hoekje and Marta van Zanten in The International Medical Graduate’s Guide to US Medicine & Residency Training (by P. Alguirre, G. Whelan, and V. Rajput), published by the American College of Physicians, 2008.
  • Practice materials, such as Good practice: Communication skills in English for the medical practitioner (by Marie McCullagh and Roz Wright, published by Cambridge University Press); book and CD

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 15, 18.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

The Importance of Empathy in Health Communication (HLOL #61)

Leslie Bank is Director of Customer Service at Montefiore Health Care System in Bronx, New York. She is also the co-author of, “I’m Sorry to Hear That…Real Life Responses to Patients’ 101 Most Common Complaints About Health Care.”

Bank has worked as a healthcare “change agent” for over three decades, always striving to assure that the patient’s voice is heard in all aspects of care. This includes her ongoing work in billing reform. In fact, many refer to Leslie Bank as “The Mother of Patient Friendly Billing.”

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What empathy is and how it helps build trusting healthcare relationships.
  • Strategies and suggestions for using empathy in day-to-day practice.
  • Stories and examples of empathy in action.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 5, 24, 27, 41.

 

Health Communication from a Native American Perspective (HLOL #44)

Linda Burhansstipanov MSPH, DrPH (or as many people say, “Linda B”) is of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. She has worked in public health for many years, taught at several universities, and is involved with a lot of research including the NIH funded projects, “Native American Cancer Education for Survivors” and “Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum.”

Linda B created and oversees the Native American Cancer Research website which is used not only by Native Americans but also by people from around the world. Linda is the author of nearly 100 peer-reviewed articles and advises many healthcare organizations about issues affecting Native Americans.

In this podcast, Linda B talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Native American concerns related to health and cancer
  • Communication strategies including stories, metaphors, and pictures
  • Creating a website with a strong cultural identity
  • Lessons learned that health communicators can use with all audiences

More Ways to Learn:

  • You can email Linda B at LindaB@natamcancer.net. But please know that it may take her a few days to reply as she may be in areas with no Internet connection.
  • Native American Cancer Research Website, available at www.natamcancer.org

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 6, 18, 25, 27, 31, 32.

Folktales as Tools for Healing (HLOL #37)

Wendy Welch PhD is a folklorist and storyteller. She is on the faculty of the Healthy Appalachia Institute and teaches Cultural Studies at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise. Wendy has served on the Board of Directors for the US National Storytelling Network and was on the National Storytelling Board in the UK.

Beyond these many professional achievements, Wendy co-owns a used bookstore, tours as storytelling performer and instructor, and is an accomplished craftswoman. In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about using folktales, personal stories, fairy tales, and urban legends as tools for healing. Topics include:

  • Using folktales with people of all ages, abilities, and cultures.
  • Using folktales to motivate behavior change.
  • Using folktales in community based participatory research.
  • Using folktales in your practice and getting more involved with research.

More ways to learn:

  • Wendy Welch welcomes hearing your story about using folktales as tools for healing. You can email Wendy directly at wow6n@uvawise.edu
  • Healthy Appalachia Institute, http://www.uvawise.edu/health
  • National Storytelling Network, http://www.storynet.org
  • Osborne, H “In other words…Tools of change: Telling and listening to stories,” On Call magazine, October 16, 2008. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=8051
  • Pantheon and Dolch are publishing houses that do and did (respectively) collections of fairy tales and multicultural folktales. Welch advises that if you find collections from either publisher (at a second-hand bookstore, perhaps) then you can rest assured they will be good.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 31.

The Healing Power of Humor & Play (HLOL #36)

Izzy Gesell M.ED, CSP knows a lot about the healing power of humor and play. With degrees in psychology and education, Izzy brings energy and joy to all he does – whether he’s working as a special education teacher, a stand-up comic, or an organizational consultant.

Izzy not only is funny in his own right but also teaches others how to use humor and play. He is the author of numerous publications including Playing Along: Group Learning Activities Borrowed From Improvisation Theater and Cancer and the Healing Power of Play.

In this podcast, Izzy talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How humor & play can add positive energy, build bridges, and create bonds.
  • Knowing when, and when not, to use humor in health communication.
  • Being humorous, even when you think you’re not funny.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 14, 40, 41.

Talking about Interactive Health Literacy & Oral Communication (HLOL #35)

Donald Rubin, PhD is Emeritus Professor of Speech Communication, of Language & Literacy Education, and of Linguistics at the University of Georgia. He is also senior researcher at that institution’s Center for Health and Risk Communication.

Much of Dr. Rubin’s work focuses on assessment, training, and analysis of oral communication, including listenability. His current research looks at 1) health literacy and health communication message design, 2) public health workforce development in communication to reduce health disparities, and 3) assessment of language proficiency among non-native speakers of English.

In this podcast, Dr. Rubin talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Interactive health literacy. How do written and spoken communication differ?
  • The communication environment. How physical and linguistic aspects affect communication.
  • Older adults. A research study about their distinct communication needs.
  • Practical strategies. How all health professionals can invite patients/consumers to participate verbally in their health care encounters.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 24, 27, 32, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast. 

Terry Davis Talks About “Baby Steps,” Action Planning (HLOL #16)

Terry C. Davis, Ph.D is a pioneer in the field of health literacy. She is Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, LA (LSUHSC-S), where she also heads the Behavioral Science Unit of the Feist-Weiller Cancer Center. She has won awards for her accomplishments and published more than ninety articles and book chapters related to health literacy, health communication, and preventive medicine.

Dr. Davis’s many health literacy accomplishments include: developing the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM); chairing Louisiana’s statewide Health Literacy Task Force; serving as master faculty of the AMA’s Train-the-Trainer Health Literacy Curriculum; and participating as a member of the Healthy People 2010 Health Literacy/Health Communication Section, and the FDA’s Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about helping patients take “baby steps” (action planning). Topics include:

  • What baby steps are and why they are needed in healthcare today
  • How baby steps help in the management of chronic disease
  • Ways to build baby steps into your healthcare practice


Ready, Set, Action Plan
Lorig, Bodenheimer

More ways to learn:

  • American College of Physicians (ACP) Foundation, Living with Diabetes: An Everyday Guide for You and Your Family. To learn more and order copies, go to http://foundation.acponline.org/hl/diabguide.htm
  • Bodenheimer T. “Coordinating care–a perilous journey through the health care system.” N Engl J Med 2008;358(10):1064-71.
  • Bodenheimer T, Davis C, Holman H. “Helping patients adopt healthier behaviors.” Clinical Diabetes 2007;25(2):66-70.
  • DeWalt DA, Davis TC, Wallace AS, Seligman HK, Bryant-Shilliday B, Arnold CL, Freburger J, Schillinger D. “Goal setting in diabetes self-management: taking the baby steps to success.” Patient Education and Counseling, April 7, 2009, PMID: 19359123.
  • Handley M, MacGregor K, Schillinger D, Sharifi C, Wong S, Bodenheimer T. “Using Action Plans to Help Primary Care Patients Adopt Healthy Behaviors: A Descriptive Study.” J Am Board Fam Med 2006;19(3):224-31.
  • Lorig K. “Action Planning: A Call To Action.” J Am Board Fam Med 2006;19(3):324-5.
  • Lorig, Bodenheimer. Ready, Set, Action Plan. 5 minute instructional video for providers and health educators.  The video demonstrates an easy, brief method for helping 3 patients create small achievable action plans. http://foundation.acponline.org/images/diabetes_dvd.wmv
  • MacGregor K, Wong S, Sharifi C, Handley M, Bodenheimer T. “The action plan project: discussing behavior change in the primary care visit.” Ann Fam Med 2005;3 Suppl 2:S39-40.
  • MacGregor K, Handley M, Wong S, et al. “Behavior-Change Action Plans in Primary Care: A Feasibility Study of Clinicians.” J Am Board Fam Med 2006;19(3):215-23.
  • Osborne H, “In other words…How to help patients manage their action planning.” On Call magazine, June 26, 2007. Available online at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=6111
  • Seligman HK, Wallace AS, DeWalt DA, et al. “Developing low-literacy patient educational materials to facilitate behavior change.” American Journal of Health Behavior 2007;31(Suppl 1):S69-78.
  • Seligman HK, Wallace AS, DeWalt DA, Schillinger D, Arnold CL, Shilliday BB, Wallace AS, Seligman HK, Davis TC, Schillinger D, Arnold CL, Bryant-Shilliday B, Freburger JK, DeWalt DA. “Literacy appropriate educational materials and brief counseling improves diabetes self-management.” Patient Education and Counseling. 2009.

Dr. Rima Rudd Talks About the Health Literacy Burden in Healthcare (HLOL #15)

Dr. Rima Rudd is Senior Lecturer on Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her work centers on health communication and the design and evaluation of public health programs. She teaches courses on innovative strategies in health education, program planning and evaluation, and health literacy.

Dr. Rudd is widely recognized as a leader in health literacy – helping to shape both the research and practice agenda in the US, Canada, and Europe. Dr. Rudd works closely with the adult education, public health, oral health, and medical sectors. Her current research looks at literacy-related disparities and literacy-related barriers to health programs, services, and care. Her Harvard website on health literacy serves scholars and practitioners.

In this podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about the health literacy burden in healthcare. Topics include:

  • Literacy-related disparities and barriers as they relate to healthcare
  • Deconstructing healthcare language, instructions, and activities
  • Literacy demands in chronic disease management, prevention, and navigation
  • Why it’s time to reconsider the definition of health literacy

More Ways to Learn:

  • Harvard School of Public Health, Health Literacy Studies. www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy
  • Communicating Health: Priorities and Strategies for Progress (2003), US Department of Health and Human Services & Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.  Dr. Rudd wrote the chapter about health literacy. Available at http://odphp.osophs.dhhs.gov/projects/healthcomm/
  • Literacy and Health in America (2004), Educational Testing Services. Dr. Rudd is one of the authors. Available at http://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/PICHEATH.pdf
  • National Center for the Study of Adult Literacy and Learning (NCSALL), http://www.ncsall.net
  • Nielsen-Bohlman L, Panzer AM, Kindig DA, (ed), 2004. Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion. The National Academies Press: Washington DC. Dr. Rudd was a member of the Institute of Medicine committee as well as writer/contributor to the book. Available at http://books.nap.edu

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Len & Ceci Doak Discuss Health Literacy’s Past, Present and Future (HLOL #13)

Cecelia (Ceci) and Leonard (Len) Doak are a husband and wife team who, for over 30 years, helped lead the way to health literacy. Their book, workshops, and articles have inspired advocates everywhere to improve health understanding.

Ceci started as a commissioned officer in the US Public Health Service. During her more 20 years there, Ceci developed and led numerous health education programs. In fact, she received a commendation from the Surgeon General for her work educating the public about cancer.

Len comes to health literacy via adult education, volunteering for many years as a tutor of non-readers. Len’s first career was as a Navy engineer and among his many accomplishments he helped simplify instructions for crews working on ships and submarines.

Len & Ceci co-authored the award-winning book, Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills. In their non-profit business Patient Learning Associates, Inc., Len and Ceci have written guidelines for many important projects and analyzed the suitability of over 2,000 healthcare materials in virtually all formats. They have presented at more than 200 health literacy workshops, training thousands of health professionals in all disciplines.

In this Health Literacy Out Loud podcast, they talk with Helen Osborne about the past, present, and future of health literacy. Topics include:

  • How health literacy began more than 30 years ago
  • Why health literacy was important then and is even more so today
  • Strategies to improve communication and assess if messages are understood
  • Ceci & Len Doak’s vision for health literacy in the future

More ways to learn:

  • Doak, Doak, & Root, Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills, Second Edition. 1996. Available for free at Harvard University School of Public Health’s Health Literacy Studies website, http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/resources/doak-book/
  • Houts, Doak, Doak, Lascalzo. “The role of pictures in improving health communication:  A review of research on the benefits of pictures on attention, comprehension, recall, and adherence.”  Patient Education and Counseling, 61 (2006) 173-190, 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words…Can They Understand? Testing Patient Education Materials With Intended Readers,” On Call Magazine, Nov 2001. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=3811

Read a transcript of this podcast. 
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Talking Health to Men (HLOL #12)

Joe Zoske, MS, MSW is the Administrative Coordinator of the BSW Social Work Program at Siena College in Loudonville, NY. He incorporates his interests in communication, literacy, and men’s health in his teaching of Health Care Communication Skills and Gender Health courses. Zoske promotes a “whole man model of male wellness,” communicating health information in ways that are male-compassionate and male-affirming.

In this podcast, he talks with Helen Osborne about communication strategies for talking health to men. Topics include:

  • Gender as it relates to cultural competence and health disparities
  • How and why men receive health messages differently than women
  • Strategies providers can use to teach men about illness and well-being

More ways to learn:

  • Men’s Health Network, PO Box 770   Washington, D.C. 20044. http://www.menshealthnetwork.org. This is the lobbying organization for men’s health in the U.S. which also promotes National Men’s Health Week.
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words… What’s the Difference? . . . Does Gender Matter When Communicating About Health?” On Call magazine, December 2004. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=3787
  • Senay, E & Waters, R. (2004). From Boys to Men: A Women’s Guide to the Health of Husbands, Partners, Sons, Fathers, and Brothers. Scribner: NY
  • Zaman, F. and Underwood, C. (March 2003). The Gender Guide for Health Communication Programs. Center Publication No. 102. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health / Center for Communication Programs. Available at http://www.jhuccp.org/pubs/cp/102/102.pdf
  • Zoske, J. Men’s Health & Wellness: 50 Health Promotion Ideas for Educators, Planners, and Practitioners. 1998. Contact Zoske directly at: Siena College, Social Work House, 515 Loudon Rd, Loudonville NY 12211.

Pauline Hamel Talks About Intergenerational Health Communication (HLOL #11)

Pauline C. Hamel, Ed.D, PT, teaches in Boston University’s online Master of Science in Health Communication program and Northeastern University’s Health Sciences program. She is a physical therapist, educator, former healthcare administrator, geriatric specialist, and now consultant. Her interests include interdisciplinary research, teaching, writing, and consulting in the areas of health communication, health literacy, public health, professional development, intergenerational service learning, and health promotion in older adults. You can reach Pauline Hamel at phamel@bu.edu.

In the podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about intergenerational health communication. Topics include:

  • How college students and older adults are often more alike than different
  • Ways different generations can learn from, and teach, one another
  • Why service learning matters and ways you can get involved

More ways to learn about intergenerational teaching and learning:

Lisa Bernstein Talks about Patient-Centered Communication (HLOL #4)

Lisa Bernstein is Executive Director and Co-founder of the What to Expect Foundation based in New York City. This non-profit organization takes its name and leadership from the best selling pregnancy guide What to Expect When You’re Expecting. The Foundation helps low-income, at-risk parents expect healthier pregnancies, safer deliveries, and happier babies. One of Lisa’s many responsibilities is directing the “Baby Basics Prenatal Health Literacy Program.”

In this Health Literacy Out Loud Podcast, she talks with Helen Osborne about using patient-centered communication to reach communities. Topics include:

  • Baby Basics: Why this easy-to-read pregnancy guide was created and ways to use it in practice.
  • How lessons learned from Baby Basics apply to many health situations including teaching about diabetes, smoking cessation and hypertension.
  • Ways to evaluate and use simply-written materials in context of a person’s life and community.

More ways to learn:

  • What to Expect Foundation website includes information about the book Baby Basics. Available at http://www.whattoexpect.org. You can reach Lisa Bernstein by email at lisab@whattoexpect.org
  • Health Literacy Out Loud (audio CD). Helen Osborne talks with Lisa Bernstein about Creating and Using Excellent Written Materials. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/buy.asp?PageID=3672
  • Osborne, H. “In Other Words… Helping Patients Ask Questions.” On Call Magazine, November/December 2006. This article includes quotes from Lisa Bernstein. Available at http://www.healthliteracy.com/article.asp?PageID=5179
  • Osborne H, 2004. Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. To order, go to most online bookstores or the publisher’s website at http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745502/
  • Zarcadoolas C, Pleasant AF, Greer DS, 2006. Advancing Health Literacy: A Framework for Understanding and Action. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 24, 27, 28, 32, 41.

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