Research to Practice: How Much Patient Teaching is Enough? (HLOL #144)

Mike Pignone headshotMichael Pignone, MD, MPH, is professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina Department of Medicine and chief of the university’s Division of General Internal Medicine. In addition to his numerous clinical and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Pignone researches chronic disease prevention and treatment, physician-patient communication, and decision-making in primary care settings. Health literacy is a thread woven throughout all his work.

In this podcast, Dr. Pignone talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Recognizing the challenge of treating patients who have chronic illnesses, complex medical regimens, and a range of interests and abilities.
  • Teaching in ways patients can learn. This starts with knowing each patient and continues with a team over time.
  • Valuing the intersection of research and practice to help patients reach their goals.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 6, 11, 27.

Read the written transcript of this podcast

Health Literacy and The Joint Commission (HLOL #139)

Cordero 3-13Christina (Tina) Cordero, PhD, MPH, is a Project Director in the Department of Standards and Survey Methods, Division of Healthcare Quality Evaluation at The Joint Commission. Among her many accomplishments, Tina developed the patient-centered communication standards and The Joint Commission monograph Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient- and Family-Centered Care: A Roadmap for Hospitals.

In this podcast, Tina Cordero talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why, how, and when The Joint Commission got interested in health literacy.
  • What The Joint Commission requires and recommends in regard to patient communication interaction.
  • The Joint Commission’s Roadmap as a resource and framework for practice.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 27, 30.

Read the podcast transcript.

Partnering with the Media to Promote Health Literacy (HLOL #127)

CHENEY_HLMChristopher Cheney is a professional journalist. He began as a staff writer at a community newspaper about 20 years ago and has worked in multiple newsroom capacities ever since. Cheney’s experience not only includes print and online media but also producing content for radio and television. Cheney now is an editor and health plan columnist at a multimedia healthcare journalism outfit, HealthLeaders Media.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Christopher Cheney about:

  • How media can broaden the reach of your health literacy message.
  • Multi-media today. Options to direct content to your specific audience.
  • Benefits, risks, and ways to create trusted partnerships with journalists.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 13, 36, 40.

Read the written transcript.

Health Literacy Screening Tools (HLOL #124)

IMG_2662Barry D Weiss, MD is a tenured professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He also is an affiliate professor of public health in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Dr. Weiss has been involved in health literacy and patient-physician communication for much of his professional career. Among his many accomplishments, he has written more than 150 journal articles, authored several books, advised numerous committees and organizations about health literacy, and developed the health literacy screening tool, the Newest Vital Sign.

In this podcast, Dr. Weiss talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Several well-known health literacy screening tools including the REALM (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine), TOFHLA (Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults), Single Item Health Literacy Screen, and NVS (the Newest Vital Sign).
  • Reasons to use, and more importantly, not to use health literacy screening tools in routine clinical settings.
  • Recommendations about communicating effectively with everyone.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 11, 27.

Read this podcast’s written transcript.

Health Literacy & the Newly Insured (HLOL #123)

DrDonRubin headshot 2010 compressed documents 269kbDr. Don Rubin is Emeritus Professor of Speech Communication, of Language & Literacy Education, and of Linguistics, at the University of Georgia. Among his many projects and responsibilities, Don chairs the Georgia Alliance for Health Literacy. He also works closely with community-based organizations that offer Navigator services—designed to assist consumers seeking health insurance through Affordable Care Act insurance exchanges.

In this podcast, Dr. Don Rubin talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why health insurance is difficult for many Americans to understand.
  • How health insurance Navigators are helping. And why Dr. Rubin considers them to be Health Literacy Heroes.
  • Examples of strategies that Navigators are using to clearly explain complex health insurance concepts.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 13, 24, 27, 30.

Read this podcast’s written transcript.

Disruptive Innovation: The Next Generation of Health Literacy Products and Services (HLOL #122)

Bio PicPamela Kelly, MBA, MJ is Director of Partnerships & Initiatives at Health Literacy Missouri (HLM). Since joining HLM in 2012, she has been reinventing what it means to be a health communications leader in the 21st century marketplace. Pam leads HLM’s statewide business development efforts and has succeeded in strengthening strategic partnerships with clients across the public and private sectors. She indeed has had a significant, measurable impact on health in Missouri.

In this podcast, Pamela Kelly talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it’s time for health literacy to move from an educational to a business model.
  • Disruptive innovation. Reaching audiences in new and different ways.
  • Tips and lessons learned for health literacy advocates at all levels of experience, savvy, and spheres of influence.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 27, 40, 42.

Read this podcast’s written transcript.

Learning and Teaching about Health & Insurance (HLOL #121)

BonnieBraunheadshotBonnie Braun, Ph.D., served as the first Director and Endowed Chair of the Horowitz Center for Health Literacy at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. Bonnie Braun is a lifelong adult educator. Her many accomplishments include authoring nearly 100 peer-reviewed articles, founding and chairing Health Literacy Maryland, and leading the creation of the award-winning consumer curriculum, Smart Choice Health Insurance.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Bonnie Braun about:

  • Teachable moments, when learners have a need or problem to solve.
  • Building a teaching framework based on well-established theories of adult learning, education, and psychology.
  • Who, why, what, and how. Essential questions to answer when preparing to teach about health or health insurance or other topics.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 6, 27, 32.

To read a written transcript, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=12071

Creating A Health Awareness Campaign (HLOL #116)

NeyalHeadshot-SmallerNeyal Ammary-Risch MPH, MCHES, is the Director of the National Eye Health Education Program and Health Literacy Coordinator at the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Her work includes overseeing programs that raise awareness about early detection and treatment of eye disease and the promotion of vision rehabilitation.

In this podcast Neyal Ammary-Risch talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How campaigns can help raise awareness about big health topics.
  • Examples of helpful awareness-raising strategies. These include using multiple communication formats, training trusted sources (such as lay health educators), and creating community partnerships.
  • Ideas about ways to raise awareness about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

  • National Eye Institute, National Eye Health Education Program. With links to many useful resources including the Healthy Eyes Toolkit. At www.nei.nih.gov/NEHEP
  • Fertman CI, Allensworth DD, Health Promotion Programs: From Theory to Practice.Jossey-Bass (2010). Ammary-Risch wrote the chapter, “Communicating Health Information Effectively.”
  • Ammary-Risch N, In Mommy’s Garden: A Book to Help Explain Cancer to Young Children. Learn more and order online at http://books.canyonbeach.com/inmommysgarden

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 13, 27.

Read the podcast transcript

Health Literacy & New Technology: An App Challenge (HLOL #115)

LierLanghansODPHPTo reach and teach people “where they are,” the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services challenged designers to create a “health literate app” for use on mobile devices (cell phones and tablets). This builds on health content from ODPHP’s consumer-oriented website about prevention, www.healthfinder.gov

This podcast is with the co-leader’s of ODPHP’s Mobile App Challenge:

  • Ellen Langhans (right, in the photo) is the healthfinder.gov Program Manager at ODPHP. Her role is to ensure the use of plain language and health literacy principles in healthfinder.gov along with its outreach and marketing materials.
  • Silje Lier is a Communication Advisor at ODPHP. She manages the outreach community for healthfinder.gov. She also supports outreach for many ODPHP initiatives including Healthy People 2020, Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy.

In this podcast, Ellen Langhans and Silje Lier talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • How people use mobile devices to access health information.
  • What ODPHP’s Mobile App Challenge was and how it led to the development of an app that is creative, functional, and consistent with health literacy principles.
  • Good app features to include action-oriented content, longevity (capacity for the app to grow and change), and functions that keep users engaged.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 27, 34, 36.

Read the podcast transcript

IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable (HLOL #114)

lhernandez150pctscaleLyla Hernandez has been a Senior Program Officer at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for many years. She served as the study director for projects that include public health, health indicators, genomics, complementary and alternative medicine, and Gulf War veterans’ health. Now, Hernandez is the Staff Director of IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable.

In this podcast, Lyla Hernandez talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable: What it is, who’s involved, and how it works.
  • Examples of how IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable is helping to create a more health literate environment for individuals and organizations.
  • Free learning tools and resources from IOM’s Health Literacy Roundtable. These include workshops, discussion papers, and webcasts.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 4, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

PEMAT: Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (HLOL #109)

cindybrachCindy Brach is the lead for health literacy and cultural competence at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Brach helped create several very important health literacy tools and resources including AHRQ’s Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit and the Institute of Medicine’s discussion paper, “Ten Attributes of a Health Literate Health Care Organization.” Now, she is one of three authors of PEMAT: Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool.

In this podcast, Cindy Brach talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How PEMAT differs from other patient education material assessment tools.
  • Using PEMAT to assess usability and actionability of print and audio-visual materials.
  • Putting PEMAT into practice. Including how to score items and then use these scores to compare patient education materials.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 3, 46, 9, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

CDC’s “Clear Communication Index” (HLOL #108)

Baur photo April 2013Cynthia Baur, PhD, works at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and leads CDC’s health literacy and plain language initiatives. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Baur is lead editor of the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy and with Dr. Christine Prue, also of the CDC, co-developed CDC’s Clear Communication Index.

In this podcast, Cynthia Baur talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What CDC’s Clear Communication Index is, why it’s needed, and how it compares to other communication assessment tools.
  • How to use the Index when revisiting, revising, or creating a wide range of public communication products. These include print materials, web postings, audio scripts, and social media messages.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 3, 6, 16, 26, 30.

To read a transcript of this podcast, go to http://healthliteracy.com/transcript.asp?PageID=11786

 

 

 

Creating a Sustainable Health Literacy Business Model (HLOL #105)

MegMeg Poag is the Executive Director of the Literacy Coalition of Central Texas. With training as a social worker and experience in health and human services, Meg has worked in the areas of housing, substance abuse, mental health, and literacy. Now Meg focuses on the design and delivery of specialized health literacy interventions.

In this podcast, Meg Poag talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Challenges in getting adequate funding for adult literacy programs, and health literacy programs.
  • The importance of creating a business plan. Why it’s needed, what’s included, and an example of how a business plan can help.
  • Creating a package of health literacy assessments, interventions, and services that hospitals actually will pay for.

More ways to learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 21, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Choosing Wisely: A Campaign Helping Patients Be Engaged Consumers (HLOL #104)

Rothschild HeadshotBeccah Rothschild, MPA, is the Senior Outreach Leader for the Choosing Wisely campaign at Consumer Reports. Beccah has over 15 years experience in the fields of adult literacy, health literacy, health communication, and outreach including direct service interventions, research, and policy. Her role at Consumer Reports focuses on patient engagement around the issues of overuse and misuse of medical tests, treatments, and procedures that provide little benefit and in some cases cause harm.

In this podcast, Beccah Rothschild talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing Wisely. How this campaign helps patients, consumers, and providers engage in important conversations about medical tests, treatments, and procedures.
  • Consumer-friendly teaching materials from Choosing Wisely. These materials not only are free and easy-to-read but also approved by national medical societies and organizations.
  • Health literacy, and its important role in the Choosing Wisely campaign.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 8, 13, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Stages of Change & Health Communication (HLOL #100)

jimandjan1James O. Prochaska, PhD is a clinical psychologist and one of the originators of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. He is founder of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, and Director of the Cancer Prevention Research Center and Professor of Psychology at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Prochaska is the author of hundreds of articles and many books including the classic, Changing for Good. Deservedly so, he has won numerous awards for innovative work about behavior change for health promotion and disease prevention.

Janice M. Prochaska, PhD is one of the most published authors in the field of social work. As President and CEO of Pro-Change Behavior Systems, she leads a team of experts in health behavior and organizational change–applying the Stages of Change Model to issues that include weight management, bullying prevention, and helping people be proactive about their health and health care.

In this podcast, Jim and Jan Prochaska talk with Helen Osborne about:

  • What the Stages of Change Model is. And how it got started.
  • Why the Stages of Change model is relevant to health literacy and health communication. Including its role in informed decision-making.
  • How listeners can use the Stages of Change Model when communicating about health. And communicating about health literacy.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Pro-Change Behavior Systems, Inc., at http://www.prochange.com/elearning
  • Prochaska JO, Norcorss J, DiClemente C. Changing for Good: A Revolutionary Six-Stage Program for Overcoming Bad Habits and Moving Your Life Positively Forward. William Morrow Paperbacks: Reprint edition (April, 2007).

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 11, 13, 27, 41.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Diagnosing Your Practice with Low Health Literacy (HLOL #96)

D in officeDarren DeWalt, MD, is practicing physician and associate professor in the division of general internal medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He researches ways that patients with low-literacy can self-manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart failure, COPD, and asthma. He also looks at how practices can achieve better outcomes through patient-physician communication and health system design. Dr. DeWalt is the lead author of AHRQ’s Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit.

In this podcast, Dr. DeWalt talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Universal precautions and health literacy. How combining these concepts can help patients better understand health information.
  • A tool to “diagnose” if your practice has low health literacy.
  • Ways to prioritize health literacy problems and implement effective solutions.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 4, 27.

Read a written transcript of this podcast.

A Conversation About the Always Use Teach-back! Toolkit (HLOL #93)

2.5.13 Mary Ann Gail SuzanneAlways Use Teach-Back is a free, interactive, online toolkit for clinicians, office staff, and others who want to confirm that their health messages are understood. It helps them learn to use teach-back every time it is indicated – to support patients and families throughout the care continuum, especially during transitions between health care settings. Here’s a link to the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit, www.teachbacktraining.org

This podcast is a conversation with the three of the toolkit’s creators:

  • Mary Ann Abrams, MD, MPH, is a long-time health literacy champion. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Abrams has led the development of Health Literacy Iowa, Iowa’s Statewide Center for Health Literacy, and Iowa Health System’s health literacy quality initiative.
  • Suzanne Rita, RN, MSN, is a nurse, an educator, and the Improvement Learning Network Manager for Iowa Health System where she mentors improvement teams and serves as an advisor to system-wide efforts.
  • Gail Nielsen is the Director of Learning and Innovation at Iowa Health System. She also is a Fellow, faculty member, and Patient Safety Scholar of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with these three guests about:

  • What the teach-back technique is, who should use it, and why.
  • How to help others make a habit of the teach-back technique.
  • Features of the Always Use Teach-Back! Toolkit
  • Ways that individuals, systems, and organizations can use the toolkit.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 2, 7, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Helping People Learn About Health in India (HLOL #91)

Aniruddha Malpani MD is a long-time health literacy advocate. He not only is an IVF (fertility) specialist in Mumbai, India but also runs the world’s largest free patient education library, HELP: Health Education Library for People. Dr. Malpani believes that empowered patients can help heal “sick” healthcare systems. In this video, Dr. Malpani talks with Helen Osborne about how this vision is happening in India.

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 13, 27, 32, 40.

Read a transcript of this video interview.

Health Literacy and Patient Safety (HLOL #88)

Paula Griswold is Executive Director of the Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors, a statewide public-private partnership to improve patient safety and reduce medical errors. Griswold has led many important collaborative projects that include reconciling medications, preventing medication errors, preventing infections, and reducing hospital readmissions—all while improving a patient’s experience of care.

In this podcast, Paula Griswold talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Ways that patient safety and health literacy interests intersect
  • Preventing medication errors: strategies and tools to improve understanding
  • Reducing hospital readmissions: advocating for system-wide solutions

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4,11, 27, 30.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Choosing A Health Plan: Ways to Make This Experience Easier and More Consumer-Friendly (HLOL #87)

Lynn Quincy is a senior health policy analyst for Consumers Union–the policy and advocacy division of Consumer Reports. Quincy works on a wide variety of health policy issues that often focus on consumer protections, consumers’ health insurance literacy, and health insurance reform at the federal and state levels.

In this podcast, Quincy talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Choosing a health plan. Why this task is often so hard for consumers.
  • Ways to make this experience easier and more consumer-friendly.
  • Strategies to help, including: choice architecture, cognitive shortcuts, stories, visuals, and doing the math for consumers.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 11, 13, 30, 36, 39.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Making Research Consent Forms Easier for Patients to Understand (HLOL #86)

Kristofer (Kris) Griffith is Manager of Human Research Regulations at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Among his many responsibilities, Griffith manages regulatory aspects of human subjects research as submitted through their Office of Protocol Research, edits the Human Subjects Research Bulletin and, along with an editorial staff, maintains MD Anderson’s Adverse Events Database.

In this podcast, Kris Griffith talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why research consent forms are so very difficult to write. And understand.
  • Strategies to help, including: listing side effects, using consistent and clear wording, formatting pages, and writing short summaries.
  • Useful tools, resources, and ways to learn more.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 8, 12, 27, 30.

Read the transcript for this podcast.

How to Create and Run Successful Health Literacy Conferences (HLOL #85)

Kari Stanley is Director of Community Benefit at Legacy Health in Portland, Oregon. In this position, Stanley develops and oversees strategies that align Legacy’s mission with its identified community needs. She also leads Legacy’s system-wide health literacy initiative. This includes creating and running a regional health literacy conference.

Stanley talks with Helen Osborne about planning her first, and now, second health literacy conference. This includes recommendations about:

  • Creating a plan with specific goals and metrics.
  • Leading a team that organizes the conference.
  • Choosing topics and vetting speakers so as to meet learning needs.
  • Funding the conference, choosing a venue, and managing other logistics.
  • Assessing success, following-up, and building enthusiasm for next year.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 27, 40.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Making a Business Case for Plain Language (HLOL #84)

Joseph Kimble is a long-time champion of plain language. For more than 25 years, he has taught legal writing and drafting at the Thomas Cooley Law School in Michigan. Kimble is a prolific writer, authoring numerous articles and books including Writing for Dollars, Writing to Please: The Case for Plain Language in Business, Government, and Law. He also is editor in chief of The Scribes of Legal Writing and editor of the “Plain Language” column in the Michigan Bar Journal.

Kimble leads, and serves on, many plain language committees, initiatives, and associations. He also helped redraft important legal documents including the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence. No surprise, Joe Kimble has won a lot of awards for his plain language advocacy and accomplishments.

In this podcast, Joe Kimble talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What plain language is and why it matters in law, as well as in health.
  • Ways to answer critics and skeptics with truths about plain language.
  • Examples of how plain language can save time and money.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 4, 27, 28.

Click here to read the written transcript.

Clearly Communicating Scientific Information (HLOL #83)

David Nelson MD, MPH is Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the National Cancer Institute. Prior to this position, Dr. Nelson worked as an epidemiologist and health communication scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is the author, co-author, or lead author of numerous books and over 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles.

In this podcast, Dr. Nelson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it can be hard to communicate scientific information to lay audiences.
  • Ways to communicate clearly–beginning with an understanding of your audience, their beliefs, and communication goals.
  • How to tell a scientific story using data, metaphor, visuals, and examples.
  • What to consider when weighing the “ethics of simplicity.”

More ways to learn:

  • Nelson DE, Hesse BW, Croyle RT (2009). Making Data Talk: Communicating Public Health Data to the Public, Policy Makers, and the Press. Oxford University Press.
  • National Cancer Institute, US Department of Health and Human Services (2011). Making Data Talk: A Workbook. At http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/cancerlibrary/MDT-Workbook.pdf
  • Parvanta C, Nelson DE, Parvanta SA, Harner RN (2010). Essentials of Public Health Communication. Jones and Bartlett Learning.
  • Remington PL, Nelson DE, Parvanta C (2002). Communicating Public Health Information Effectively: A Guide for Practitioners. American Public Health Association.
  • Osborne H (2004). “In Other Words…The Ethics of Simplicity,” On Call magazine. Available at www.healthliteracy.com/ethics-of-simplicity
  • Rosling, Hans (2010). “The Joy of Stats,” Wingspan Productions for BBC. At http://www.gapminder.org/videos/the-joy-of-stats/

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 9, 11, 26, 28, 30.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

 

Attributes of Health Literate Organizations (HLOL #82)

Cindy Brach is the lead for health literacy and cultural competence at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Brach has overseen the development of several health literacy tools including the Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit. She is also the first author of “Ten Attributes of a Health Literate Health Care Organization,” a discussion paper published in June 2012 by the Institute of Medicine.

In this podcast, Cindy Brach talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What “health literate organizations” are and why they matter.
  • How this paper was inspired by the National Standards on Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) from the HHS Office of Minority Health
  • Ten attributes of health literate health care organizations, along with examples and resources to learn more.

More Ways to Learn:

Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition (Updated 2018), by Helen Osborne. Relevant chapters include: 1, 27.

Read a transcript of this podcast.

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