Open Notes: Building Transparency, Trust, and Better Health Outcomes (HLOL #154)

WoodsSusan Woods, MD, MPH, is a seasoned health care and technology executive with broad experience spanning private and public sectors. Dr. Woods not only is a general internist but also consumer informatics expert and Director of Patient Experience for the Connected Care Office at the Veterans Health Administration. Her work focuses on using technology to engage patients and families in health and healthcare. One way is by patients accessing their notes in medical records, otherwise known as Open Notes.

In this podcast, Dr. Susan Woods talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Open Notes, a way for patients to electronically and securely access their own clinical notes thought a patient portal.
  • How Open Notes benefit patients and providers through transparency, trust, and better health outcomes.
  • What to do even if your healthcare system does not yet use Open Notes.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast. 

Making Personal Health Records Accessible to All (HLOL #153)

MRothberg_Headshot_hiresMadeleine Rothberg works at the Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at the public television and radio station, WGBH. Madeleine works to ensure that multimedia and information technology is accessible to all users, including people with disabilities. One of her many accomplishments is leading the Accessible Designs for Personal Health Records Project.

In this podcast, Madeleine Rothberg talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Personal Health Records (PHR). What they are and how PHRs are being used to promote health with personalized health information and education.
  • The Accessible Designs for Personal Health Records Project. Creating a model of making personal health information accessible to those who are blind, deaf, or have physical disabilities.
  • Simple tips and recommendations to help make websites more accessible by all.

More ways to learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast.

After Visit Summaries (HLOL #152)

image001-2Alex Federman. MD, MPH, is an aging-focused health services researcher at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. His research addresses chronic illness self-management in older adults and focuses on health literacy, cognition and health-related beliefs. Dr. Federman also provides primary care to adults in clinic and home-based settings in New York City.

In this podcast, Dr. Federman talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • After Visit Summaries (AVS), electronic health records, and other ways for patients and providers to exchange information.
  • Language, formatting, and other reasons AVS are not yet ideal patient summaries.
  • Ways providers and patients can use AVS to increase understanding and improve the delivery of care.

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Making a Case to Senior Leaders about Health Literacy (HLOL #151)

Barbara for Social Media-003Barbara Balik RN, EdD, worked as a nurse and nurse practitioner before moving into leadership roles as chief nursing officer, executive vice president and then CEO of large hospitals and clinics in an extensive healthcare system. Balik co-founded Aefina Partners, an organization committed to healthcare transformation through partnerships among healthcare leaders, physicians, team members, patients, and families. She is on the Senior Faculty at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and a member of the National Patient Safety Foundation Board of Governors.

In the podcast, Barbara Balik talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Framing health literacy as essential for partnerships with patients, families, and the community.
  • Six steps for talking about health literacy with senior executives.
  • Making a case for health literacy even when it feels like pushing a rock up the hill.

More ways to learn:

Read the transcript for this podcast. 

Ethics to Consider When Communicating About Health (HLOL #150)

mbsiegel_largeDr. Michael Siegel is a Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. He is a long-time researcher in tobacco control, publishing extensively on topics that include secondhand smoke, tobacco policy, and national strategies to reduce tobacco use. Dr. Siegel is a leader in the anti-tobacco movement, testifying in support of smoke-free workplace laws and serving as an expert witness in lawsuits against tobacco companies.

In this podcast, Dr. Michael Siegel talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Hard choices to make when conveying information to the public. For instance, is the intent of your message to inform or persuade? How to communicate risk?
  • Examples of how to be honest, transparent, and clear when informing others about health.
  • Building a trusted relationship with the audience and maintain credibility over time.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Osborne H, Health Literacy from A to Z: Practical Ways to Communicate Your Health Message, Second Edition. 2011, Jones & Bartlett Learning. Includes the chapter, “Ethics of Simplicity.”
  • Osborne H, “In other words: The ethics of simplicity,” On Call magazine, 2004. At http://healthliteracy.com/2004/03/01/ethics-of-simplicity-3/

Read the podcast transcript.

Working with Journalists to Communicate about Health (HLOL #149)

imgres-1-1Beth Daley is a senior investigative reporter and senior trainer at the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR), a non-profit based at Boston University and the public television/radio station WGBH. Prior to NECIR, Daley was a reporter for many years at The Boston Globe, focusing primarily on science and the environment. She has won numerous national journalism awards including a Knight Journalism Fellowship and being named a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

In this podcast, Beth Daley talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The different forms of journalism including newspaper reporting, enterprise stories, and in-depth investigations.
  • Challenges ahead for journalists and health literacy when communicating about complicated new topics, such as genomics.
  • Ways that non-journalists can be discerning consumers of health and health news.
  • Types of stories that may be of interest to journalists.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast.

Lawyers Can Help with Health Literacy, Too (HLOL #148)

Trudeau-faculty picture-touched upChristopher Trudeau is a Professor at Western Michigan University, Thomas M. Cooley Law School. He is one of the leading advocates on health literacy and the law and widely recognized as an expert on informed consent. Trudeau often speaks to audiences of health professionals, or lawyers, or both about creating processes to not only engage patients but also protect healthcare organizations.

In this podcast, Christopher Trudeau talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why lawyers are starting to be more aware of, and engaged with, health literacy
  • How lawyers can use plain language to protect their clients while also helping patients understand medical-legal information
  • Ways that public health professionals, clinicians, and others can start working with lawyers to make health messages clear

More ways to learn:

Read the written transcript.

Children, Media, and Positive Health Messaging (HLOL #147)

Dina and friendDina Borzekowski, Ed.D., is the Interim Director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Health Literacy. She also is an international expert on children, media, and health. Borzekowski’s research explores how children and adolescents use media as well as media’s effect on the health and well-being of youth.

In this podcast, Dina Borzekowski talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • The intersection of children everywhere with media in its many formats.
  • Research about positive and negative effects of media on children of all ages.
  • Recommendations for developing media messages that can improve children’s lives.
  • Ways professionals and parents can help when it comes to media messages.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Borzekkowski DLG, Cohen JE, “International Reach of Tobacco Marketing Among Young Children,” Pediatrics, Volume 132, Number 4, October 2013.
  • Borzekowski, DLG, “Considering Children and Health Literacy: A Theoretical Approach,” Pediatrics 2009;124;S282.
  • Borzekowski is happy to chat about health literacy or children, media, and health. Feel free to contact her by email at dborzeko@umd.edu

Read the transcript for this podcast. 

Implicit Bias: A Factor in Health Communication (HLOL #146)

Winston WongWinston F. Wong, MD, MS, FAAFP, is a practicing physician who also serves as the Medical Director of Community Benefit at Kaiser Permanente. His work includes developing community and organizational partnerships to eliminate health disparities. Dr. Wong has won numerous awards and serves on a number of national advisory boards including the Institute of Medicine’s Health Literacy Roundtable.

In this podcast, Dr. Wong talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What implicit bias is and examples of how it can affect health communication.
  • Why even those who consider themselves as unbiased may unconsciously make snap judgments based on how others look and speak.
  • Health literacy and implicit bias. Recommendations of ways to improve health communication and actively explore what matters to each patient.

More ways to learn:

Read the transcript of this podcast.

Patients as Consumers: Physician Conflict of Interest (HLOL #145)

49645James Rickert MD is a practicing orthopedic surgeon. He also serves on the clinical faculty of Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Rickert founded and is president of The Society for Patient Centered Orthopedic Surgery, a group of orthopedists advocating for the interests of patients in the US health care reform debate. He has published many articles on the same topic, too.

In this podcast, James Rickert talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Looking at healthcare from the perspectives of both a patient and provider.
  • How physician ownership of imaging centers, device distributorships, and other sources of non-clinical revenue sometimes conflicts with a patient’s best interest.
  • How patients can start being savvy consumers of healthcare services and products.

More Ways to Learn:

Read a transcript of this podcast

Research to Practice: How Much Patient Teaching is Enough? (HLOL #144)

Mike Pignone headshotMichael Pignone, MD, MPH, is professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina Department of Medicine and chief of the university’s Division of General Internal Medicine. In addition to his numerous clinical and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Pignone researches chronic disease prevention and treatment, physician-patient communication, and decision-making in primary care settings. Health literacy is a thread woven throughout all his work.

In this podcast, Dr. Pignone talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Recognizing the challenge of treating patients who have chronic illnesses, complex medical regimens, and a range of interests and abilities.
  • Teaching in ways patients can learn. This starts with knowing each patient and continues with a team over time.
  • Valuing the intersection of research and practice to help patients reach their goals.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript of this podcast

Creating Videos of Patients’ Stories to Inspire and Remind Caregivers About Why Their Work Matters (HLOL #143)

2015 headshotChad Brough is Executive Director of the Office of Patient Experience at Cone Health in Greensboro, NC. While his accomplishments are many, Chad succinctly summarized his work in words he uses as his Twitter profile, “Chad Brough stands for healthcare that is more compassionate, less complicated, more affordable, and more predictable.”

In this podcast, Chad Brough talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How patients’ stories help inspire caregivers about the importance of caregiving.
  • Why patients so willingly share their stories as a way to give back and say thanks.
  • Good, better, and best ways to help tell patients’ stories. From reading heartfelt letters, to sharing family photos, to producing videotaped stories.
  • Recommendations, lessons learned, and stories about storytelling in healthcare.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written podcast transcript.

What To Do When Teaching About the Flu (HLOL #142)

Sparks photoSteve Sparks is the director of Wisconsin Health Literacy, a division of Wisconsin Literacy, Inc. There, he provides consultation, training, and coordination for statewide health literacy programs, communications, and interventions. Before Wisconsin Health Literacy, Steve held marketing and communications positions in hospitals, health systems, and taught college-level communication courses.

In this podcast, Steve Sparks talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why it’s important, yet also difficult, to teach about the flu.
  • Strategies that work including collaborating with organizations trusted by the intended audience, meeting at places people already go, creating an informal tone, being interactive, using health literacy principles throughout.
  • How health literacy approaches enhance success in populations harder to reach.
  • Getting funding, measuring success, and other behind-the-scene necessities.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the transcript for this podcast.

Literacy & Health Literacy (HLOL #141)

Michele Erikson photoMichele Erikson has been involved with adult literacy for many years. She started as a volunteer literacy tutor and now serves as Executive Director of Wisconsin Literacy, Inc. One of Michele’s many accomplishments is overseeing Wisconsin Literacy’s Health Literacy division that not only hosts national health literacy summits but also works closely with adult learners and healthcare professionals to ensure that health information is communicated in ways everyone can understand.

In this podcast, Michele Erikson talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Literacy, an acquired skill that goes beyond decoding written words.
  • Is reading a problem? Why, who, and what to do to improve understanding.
  • How literacy and health literacy overlap, intersect, and differ from the other.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Wisconsin Literacy, Inc. Includes information about Wisconsin Health Literacy. At http://wisconsinliteracy.org/health-literacy/
  • Contact Wisconsin Health Literacy’s director, Steve Sparks at steve@wisconsinliteracy.org or call 608-257-1655
  • Hotdogs and Hamburgers: Unlocking Life’s Potential through Literacy at Any Age, by Rob Shindler. This book includes an insider’s view on tutoring adults.

More Ways to Make a Difference:

  • Volunteer to be a tutor. Change someone’s life through literacy.
  • Advocate to legislators, business leaders and community officials.
  • Ask if your doctor’s clinic participates in Reach Out and Read.
  • Donate or become a member of your local literacy agency.
  • Ask your local service club (Rotary, Kiwanis, Altrusa, Lions, Etc.) to get involved.
  • Use plain language in all your health care communications.

Read the written podcast transcript.

Ethnodrama: Conveying Health Concepts in Culturally Relevant Ways (HLOL #140)

Anita Woodley - Headshot Black & WhiteAnita Woodley is an award-winning actress, playwright, producer, musician, poet, and journalist. She also is a certified HIV counselor and advocate for many healthcare initiatives. One powerful way that Anita communicates is with ethnodramas—non-traditional theatrical performances based on ethnographic research data used to educate, promote, and prevent harmful practices to overall health.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Anita Woodley about:

  • How theatric performances can communicate health messages in meaningful, memorable, and culturally relevant ways.
  • Examples of using characters, language, and laughter to teach about health.
  • Woodley’s suggestions about ways everyone (not just actors) can be authentic and inform those we care about, and care for.

More Ways to Learn

  • Anita Woodley: Award-winning Entertainer, Journalist, and Visual Artist. Read about, watch, and learn much more at Anitawoodley.com
  • Strang F, Gonzalez S, 100 Perks of Having Cancer plus 100 Health Tips For Surviving It. At http://100perksofhavingcancer.com

Read the written podcast transcript.

Health Literacy and The Joint Commission (HLOL #139)

Cordero 3-13Christina (Tina) Cordero, PhD, MPH, is a Project Director in the Department of Standards and Survey Methods, Division of Healthcare Quality Evaluation at The Joint Commission. Among her many accomplishments, Tina developed the patient-centered communication standards and The Joint Commission monograph Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient- and Family-Centered Care: A Roadmap for Hospitals.

In this podcast, Tina Cordero talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Why, how, and when The Joint Commission got interested in health literacy.
  • What The Joint Commission requires and recommends in regard to patient communication interaction.
  • The Joint Commission’s Roadmap as a resource and framework for practice.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the podcast transcript.

Reporting about the Patient Experience (HLOL #138)

BarbaraLambiaso.2013Barbara Lambiaso is Senior Project Manager for Communications at Massachusetts Health Quality Partners (MHQP) based in Watertown, MA. Building on many years of experience in health and health care communications, Barbara oversees all aspects of HealthcareCompassMA.org, a website where the public can find easy-to-understand information and data about quality healthcare in Massachusetts.

In this podcast, Barbara Lambiaso talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • Designing a useful, usable consumer website based on healthcare quality data.
  • Making choices about navigation, wording, images, and layering of information.
  • Working with the intended audience to make this website even better.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

How to Find and Use Health Apps (HLOL #137)

rschnallRebecca Schnall, PhD, RN, is a nurse-researcher whose work focuses on informatics strategies for persons from underserved communities. One of her many accomplishments is researching ways that health information technology can help prevent disease, improve care, and reduce health disparities for persons at risk for, or living with, HIV.

In this podcast, Rebecca Schnall talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What are apps? What are health apps? Examples of how apps can provide real-time, personalized, health information that patients want to know and use now.
  • Tips for finding good health apps. Including how to search for what you need, what to be cautious about, and issues of privacy and confidentiality.
  • Looking ahead to what’s next in health app technology.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

Communicating About Health with LGBTQ Youth (HLOL #136)

VettersRalph Vetters MD, MPH, is the site medical director of the Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center, a program of Fenway Health in Boston, MA. He is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and trained as a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Boston Medical Center. The Sidney Borum, Jr. Health Center focuses on caring for youth who are alienated from the traditional health care system – LGBTQ youth, street youth and homeless youth.

In this podcast, Dr. Ralph Vetters talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What this term means, who it includes, and how it covers a wide range of issues and identities.
  • Strategies to communicate health information in ways that are respectful, helpful, and inclusive. This includes pronouns, words, non-words, health history forms, and electronic medical records.
  • How health literacy and communicating with LGBTQ youth share many characteristics, goals, and strategies.

More ways to learn:

Read the written transcript.

Reviewing Health News (HLOL #135)

HiRes - STE_7127 2Gary Schwitzer has published HealthNewsReview.org since 2006. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and director of the Center for Media Communication & Health. Previously, he directed a health journalism graduate program. Schwitzer has been working in, and with, the media for many years. No surprise, he has received numerous awards for his many contributions to medical communication.

In this podcast, Gary Schwitzer talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How HealthNewsReview analyzes, grades, and works to improve journalism and public dialogue about health news.
  • Ways health communicators can help increase the public’s understanding about health issues, information, and implication of their choices. An example is making sense about screening, versus diagnostic, tests.
  • Resources and models of clearly communicating nuanced health information.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.

Translating Health Information (HLOL #134)

photoLise Anne Boissonneault, B.Sc.L., M. Ed., is a translator and language instructor who has worked in health care for over 25 years in Northern Ontario, Canada. She has translated countless health-related documents from English to French for the general public and managed a busy translation service. Lise Anne has also taught French to health care professionals and undergraduate students.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Lise Anne Boissonneault about:

  • Role of translations in healthcare and how they differ from interpretation.
  • Important translation considerations including culture, context, and geography.
  • What to do, and not do, to validate that your translated message is correct.

Read the written transcript.

Improving the Patient Experience: How Healthcare Settings Can Build on Strategies that Work Well in Hotels (HLOL #133)

Andrés ValenciaAndrés Valencia is a business leader with more than 10 years experience as a manager in international hospitality. He has worked at top-end hotels, including the Ritz-Carlton. Valencia now brings a wealth of customer service and business best practices from the hotel industry to healthcare. He currently works at the Patient Experience and Engagement Program at the University of Chicago Medicine.

In this podcast, Andrés Valencia talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • What’s alike and what’s different in the fields of hospitality, hotel management, and healthcare.
  • Whether in hotels or healthcare settings, the importance of providing a warm welcome, pleasant stay, and warm good-bye.
  • Helping all staff better understand how to improve the patient experience.

Read the written transcript.

Helping Teens Transition from Pediatrics to Adult-Centered Care (HLOL #132)

CDS CAC member Cory NourieCory Ellen Nourie, MSS, MLSP, is the Transition Social Work Coordinator at Nemours Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE. She supports young adults with disabilities and special health care needs as they transition to adulthood. Nourie is active in research and advocacy work, serves on numerous advisory boards, and frequently gives presentations about young adults’ disease self-management and transitions in healthcare services.

In this podcast, Cory Nourie talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • How a healthcare transition is a planned purposeful movement from pediatric care to adult medicine.
  • Ways children can start assuming responsibility for their own medical management.
  • What physicians, other clinicians, office staff, parents, and others can do to help.

More ways to learn:

  • Got Transition. Includes strategies for health professionals, youth, and families. At http://www.gottransition.org
  • Nemours Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children produced a series of videos about healthcare transition. They include “Becoming an Adult: Taking More Responsibility for My Care” at http://youtu.be/cjXurYrFMZM

Read the written transcript.

A Patient’s Perspective about Health Communication (HLOL #131)

RJoffe web sizeRosalind Joffe is founder and president of ciCoach, giving people who live with chronic health conditions the tools they need to thrive at work. Rosalind knows these issues well as she herself as lived with chronic illness for over 35 years. As both a patient and consumer advocate, Rosalind chairs the Patient Engagement Council of Massachusetts Health Quality Partners. She’s a coach who writes, blogs, and speaks about chronic health challenges and its impact on career.

In this podcast, Rosalind Joffe talks with Helen Osborne about:

  • “Patient-provider engagement,” a term that reflects joint sharing of information.
  • Why two-way health communication matters so much to everyone today.
  • Examples and suggestions about ways that patients and providers can engage in collaborative, respectful, health communication.

More Ways to Learn:

  • Working with Chronic Illness: A blog about living and working with chronic illness and difficult health challenges. At http://cicoach.com/blog/
  • Joffe R, Friedlander J. Women, Work and Autoimmune Disease: Keep Working Girlfriend! A book published by Demos Health, 2008.
  • Massachusetts Health Quality Partners, at http://www.mhqp.org

Read the written transcript.

Health Literacy and Hearing Loss (HLOL #130)

MckeeMikeMichael McKee, MD, MPH, is a family medicine physician and Assistant Professor at the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan. Dr. McKee’s clinical work and research focuses on health care access, health literacy, and health communication with disadvantaged populations including those who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Dr. McKee not only has a professional interest in this topic but also personal experience as he himself has a profound hearing loss.

In this podcast, Helen Osborne talks with Dr. Michael McKee about:

  • How hearing loss can affect health knowledge and understanding.
  • Assessing a person’s preferred language and mode of communication.
  • Respectful ways to improve communication as with pictures, technology, and community education.

More Ways to Learn:

Read the written transcript.